Generations of American leaders from across the political spectrum have supported the goal of a bipartisan foreign policy. The U.S. Institute of Peace, a congressionally funded national institute, advances this objective with a series of Bipartisan Congressional Dialogues. USIP brings together leaders from both political parties in public discussions to develop solutions for urgent national security and foreign policy problems.

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In each dialogue of the series, Republican and Democratic members of Congress discuss their shared interest in a specific foreign policy challenge and examine ways to address the problem with USIP leaders.

Generations of American leaders from across the political spectrum have supported the goal of a bipartisan foreign policy. USIP, a congressionally funded national Institute, advances this objective through a series of Bipartisan Congressional Dialogues. USIP brings together leaders from both political parties for public discussions to develop solutions to the nation’s most urgent national security and foreign policy challenges. In each dialogue of the series, Republican and Democratic members of Congress join USIP leaders to discuss their shared interest in a specific foreign policy challenge and examine ways to address the problem.

Bipartisan Congressional Dialogues have tackled such pressing national security topics as Russia’s role in Europe, negotiations with North Korea, democracy and women’s rights in Afghanistan, China’s growing international influence, ensuring effective diplomacy and development, and terrorism and evolving cybersecurity threats.

Past Events

Panel

Addressing China’s Economic and Military Coercion in the Indo-Pacific

June 21, 2019

Representatives Ed Case (D-HI) and John Rutherford (R-FL), members of the House Appropriations Committee, discussed how the U.S. can address China’s power projection and coercion in the Indo-Pacific at USIP’s ninth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue. Reps. Case and Rutherford are both members of the House Appropriations Military Construction and Veterans’ Affairs Subcommittee and recently traveled to the Indo-Pacific region.

Representatives Ami Bera (D-CA), left, and Lee Zeldin (R-NY), right, talk with U.S. Institute of Peace President Nancy Lindborg, May 10, 2019.

Diplomacy and Development in a Complex Global Landscape

May 10, 2019

Representatives Ami Bera (D-CA) and Lee Zeldin (R-NY), leaders of the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, discussed how U.S. diplomacy and development are working to achieve America’s goals and adapt to the changing global landscape at USIP’s eighth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue. Rep. Bera is the chairman and Rep. Zeldin is the ranking member of the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee, which oversees U.S. diplomacy and development. 

Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL), Nancy Lindborg, and Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA)

Soft Power in a Sharp Power World: Countering Coercion and Information Warfare

November 28, 2018

Former U.S. ambassadors Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL) and Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA) discussed their views on how soft power tools can and should be used to counter sharp power employed by global adversaries at USIP’s seventh Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue on Wednesday, November 28. Rep. Rooney is the vice chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee and former U.S. ambassador to the Holy See. Rep. Beyer is the vice ranking member of the Science, Space and Technology Committee and former U.S. ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein. 

Chris Stewart (R-UT), Nancy Lindborg, and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD)

China: Managing Conflict and Competition

September 27, 2018

Representatives Chris Stewart (R-UT) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD) discussed preserving U.S. national security interests with China’s growing international influence at USIP’s sixth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue. Both representatives are members of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs. Stewart serves on the House Intelligence Committee and Ruppersberger is a former ranking member of the committee.

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Countering Illicit Funding of Terrorism: A Congressional Approach

April 17, 2018

Representatives Steve Pearce (R-NM) and Jim Himes (D-CT) discussed evolving cybersecurity threats to U.S. interests at USIP’s second Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue on a bipartisan approach to evolving cybersecurity threats. Representatives Pearce and Himes are both Members of the House Financial Services Subcommittee on Terrorism and Illicit Finance, and Representative Pearce is the Chairman of this Subcommittee.

Related Publications

A Rising China Has Pacific Islands in Its Sights

A Rising China Has Pacific Islands in Its Sights

Thursday, July 23, 2020

By: Ashish Kumar Sen

As part of its bid to expand its influence across the world, China is emerging as an important diplomatic and economic partner for the small and far-flung Pacific Islands countries, but its engagement comes with challenges. As the economies of the Pacific Islands countries reel in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, Chinese loans and aid are likely to become even more important in the coming months. China’s growing footprint in the region also brings a strategic challenge to the United States’ doorstep at a time when the U.S.-China relationship is under considerable strain.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

To Protect Afghan Women’s Rights, U.S. Must Remain Engaged

To Protect Afghan Women’s Rights, U.S. Must Remain Engaged

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

By: Adam Gallagher

It’s been over a year since the U.S., led by Amb. Zalmay Khalilzad, opened talks with the Taliban aimed at ending the 18-year war. Over that year, Afghan women have demanded a seat at the negotiating table, worried that the hard-won gains made over the last two decades could be in jeopardy. Even with the peace process stalled, “it is vital that the U.S. remain engaged” to ensure that Afghan women’s rights are protected, said Rep. Martha Roby (R-AL) last week at the U.S. Institute of Peace’s latest Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Gender; Democracy & Governance

China Trade War: Risks and Strategies

China Trade War: Risks and Strategies

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

By: USIP Staff

The chances that trade talks scheduled to resume with China next month will result in any broad agreement with the U.S. are slim to none, said two members of a bipartisan congressional panel focused on U.S.-China relations. “It’s important that we keep talking,” said Rep. Rick Larsen (D-WA), the co-chair of the House of Representatives U.S.-China Working Group. “That’s a positive, but I haven’t seen anything that has changed to ensure that something would be different” when U.S. and Chinese trade officials are scheduled to sit down again in early October.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Economics & Environment; Global Policy

As China Projects Power in the Indo-Pacific, How Should the U.S. Respond?

As China Projects Power in the Indo-Pacific, How Should the U.S. Respond?

Tuesday, June 25, 2019

By: Adam Gallagher

There is a growing bipartisan consensus in Washington that China’s ascendance is a major strategic concern for U.S. and international security and stability. This is reflected in the 2017 U.S. National Security Strategy, which recalibrates U.S. foreign policy to address the challenges posed to American power and interests from escalating geopolitical competition with China and Russia. After a recent trip to the Indo-Pacific region, Rep. Ed Case (D-HI) and Rep. John Rutherford (R-FL) said they came away alarmed at how China is tightening its grip on U.S. allies across the region. What can the U.S. do to address China’s power projection and coercion in the Indo-Pacific and beyond?

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

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Latest Publications

Beyond Security: The Quest for a Sustained, Strategic U.S.-Iraq Partnership

Beyond Security: The Quest for a Sustained, Strategic U.S.-Iraq Partnership

Thursday, July 29, 2021

By: Sarhang Hamasaeed

On Monday, President Joe Biden received Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi at the Oval Office to strengthen bilateral relations and discuss matters of mutual interest, key among them being the future of U.S. troops in Iraq. Despite widespread thinking that Iraq and the Middle East do not rank high in the mix of the Biden administration’s priorities, there have been clear signals that Iraq remains important enough to the United States and that Kadhimi and his government are partners that the United States can work with and should support. While most of the media attention focused on the announcement of the change in U.S. force posture in Iraq, the key takeaway from this week’s meeting is that the United States and Iraq seek to maintain their strategic partnership — and build on it.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy; Fragility & Resilience

Taliban’s Violent Advances Augur Bleak Future for Afghan Women

Taliban’s Violent Advances Augur Bleak Future for Afghan Women

Thursday, July 29, 2021

By: Belquis Ahmadi

Mere days after the United States failed to meet the May 1 troop withdrawal deadline stipulated in its 2019 deal with the Taliban, the militant group began launching major attacks on Afghan security forces and taking control of administrative districts. While disputed, some estimates suggest the Taliban now have control of half of the districts across the country. The violence has already wrought a heavy toll — and women and girls have borne the early brunt.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Gender; Violent Extremism

Five Key Considerations To Make the U.S. Global Fragility Strategy Work

Five Key Considerations To Make the U.S. Global Fragility Strategy Work

Wednesday, July 28, 2021

By: Corinne Graff; Tyler Beckelman

Even as the public debate over the U.S. military withdrawal from Afghanistan continues, the State Department and USAID are quietly putting plans in place to test a new approach to con-flicts overseas. Drawing on the hard-earned lessons from Afghanistan and Iraq over the past two decades, this approach would have the United States rely far less on military power and far more on sustained — but much less costly — diplomacy and closely coordinated development investments. If fully implemented, consistent with the recently enacted Global Fragility Act, this new effort promises to help stabilize countries in their recovery from COVID-19 and the knock-on shocks to their economies. 

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & Resilience; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

At 70, Refugee Convention Faces Many Challenges, Says Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield

At 70, Refugee Convention Faces Many Challenges, Says Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield

Wednesday, July 28, 2021

By: Ashish Kumar Sen

Seventy years after its ratification, the Convention of Refugees remains an important pillar of the international system. Every day, conflict, hunger, economic deprivation and climate change are forcing people around the world to flee their homes in search of a better life. It is critical, therefore, that the international community uphold their obligations under the convention, while elevating efforts to address the root causes of migration, according to U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas-Greenfield.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Human Rights; Global Policy

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