Generations of American leaders from across the political spectrum have supported the goal of a bipartisan foreign policy. The U.S. Institute of Peace, a congressionally funded national institute, advances this objective with a series of Bipartisan Congressional Dialogues. USIP brings together leaders from both political parties in public discussions to develop solutions for urgent national security and foreign policy problems.

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In each dialogue of the series, Republican and Democratic members of Congress discuss their shared interest in a specific foreign policy challenge and examine ways to address the problem with USIP leaders.

Bipartisan Congressional Dialogues have tackled such hot-button national security topics as Russia’s role in Europe, negotiations with North Korea, democracy and women’s rights in Afghanistan, China’s growing international influence, ensuring effective diplomacy and development, and terrorism and evolving cybersecurity threats.

This series furthers USIP’s congressional mission to reduce violent conflict abroad in accordance with America’s national interests and values. USIP, an institution that symbolizes the United States’ commitment to peace, provides a unique, nonpartisan, foreign policy forum for these discussions.

Past Events

Panel

Addressing China’s Economic and Military Coercion in the Indo-Pacific

June 21, 2019

Representatives Ed Case (D-HI) and John Rutherford (R-FL), members of the House Appropriations Committee, discussed how the U.S. can address China’s power projection and coercion in the Indo-Pacific at USIP’s ninth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue. Reps. Case and Rutherford are both members of the House Appropriations Military Construction and Veterans’ Affairs Subcommittee and recently traveled to the Indo-Pacific region.

Representatives Ami Bera (D-CA), left, and Lee Zeldin (R-NY), right, talk with U.S. Institute of Peace President Nancy Lindborg, May 10, 2019.

Diplomacy and Development in a Complex Global Landscape

May 10, 2019

Representatives Ami Bera (D-CA) and Lee Zeldin (R-NY), leaders of the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, discussed how U.S. diplomacy and development are working to achieve America’s goals and adapt to the changing global landscape at USIP’s eighth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue. Rep. Bera is the chairman and Rep. Zeldin is the ranking member of the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee, which oversees U.S. diplomacy and development. 

Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL), Nancy Lindborg, and Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA)

Soft Power in a Sharp Power World: Countering Coercion and Information Warfare

November 28, 2018

Former U.S. ambassadors Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL) and Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA) discussed their views on how soft power tools can and should be used to counter sharp power employed by global adversaries at USIP’s seventh Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue on Wednesday, November 28. Rep. Rooney is the vice chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee and former U.S. ambassador to the Holy See. Rep. Beyer is the vice ranking member of the Science, Space and Technology Committee and former U.S. ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein. 

Chris Stewart (R-UT), Nancy Lindborg, and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD)

China: Managing Conflict and Competition

September 27, 2018

Representatives Chris Stewart (R-UT) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD) discussed preserving U.S. national security interests with China’s growing international influence at USIP’s sixth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue. Both representatives are members of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs. Stewart serves on the House Intelligence Committee and Ruppersberger is a former ranking member of the committee.

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Countering Illicit Funding of Terrorism: A Congressional Approach

April 17, 2018

Representatives Steve Pearce (R-NM) and Jim Himes (D-CT) discussed evolving cybersecurity threats to U.S. interests at USIP’s second Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue on a bipartisan approach to evolving cybersecurity threats. Representatives Pearce and Himes are both Members of the House Financial Services Subcommittee on Terrorism and Illicit Finance, and Representative Pearce is the Chairman of this Subcommittee.

Latest Publications

Xi Jinping’s Visit to Myanmar: What Are the Implications?

Xi Jinping’s Visit to Myanmar: What Are the Implications?

Thursday, January 23, 2020

By: Jason Tower; Jennifer Staats

From January 17-18, the chairman of China’s Communist Party, Xi Jinping, travelled to Myanmar to promote bilateral ties and advance construction of the China-Myanmar Economic Corridor (CMEC). The visit saw the two sides commit to an ambitious economic agenda and building what China terms a “community of shared destiny.” The declarations of cooperation, however, failed to provide any clarity on how CMEC will address the countless questions and concerns that Myanmar has struggled with since its independence in 1948—issues likely to profoundly affect the two countries’ joint endeavors.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

The Challenges for Social Movements in Post-Mugabe Zimbabwe

The Challenges for Social Movements in Post-Mugabe Zimbabwe

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

By: Gladys Kudzaishe Hlatywayo; Charles Mangongera

Civil society and social movements have long been at the center of pushing back against corruption and authoritarian practices. Zimbabwe was no exception in the run-up to the November 2017 coup d’état that ousted Robert Mugabe after four decades of unaccountable rule. This report, based on in-country interviews and focus group discussions, examines the transition that followed the coup to draw broader lessons for how the international community can support, without harming, grassroots nonviolent action initiatives in countries undergoing profound political shifts.

Type: Special Report

Nonviolent Action

Preventing Election Violence Through Diplomacy

Preventing Election Violence Through Diplomacy

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

By: Bhojraj Pokharel

Focusing on three case studies in Africa, this book analyzes the utility of diplomacy in preventing election violence. After defining and identifying the key dimensions of preventive diplomacy to prevent or reduce election violence, it looks at presidential elections between 2006 and 2017 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, and Nigeria. Drawing on personal experience, the literature, case study reviews, and expert interviews and roundtables with academics and practitioners, the book highlights conditions for the success and the failure of preventive diplomacy, offering recommendations to the international community for maximizing the efficacy of this unique tool.

Type: Book

Electoral Violence

After Berlin, Will Foreign Actors Back Out of Libya’s Civil War?

After Berlin, Will Foreign Actors Back Out of Libya’s Civil War?

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

By: Nate Wilson; Thomas M. Hill

Tags: Dialogue, Mediation & Negotiation Published: January 21, 2020 / By: Nate Wilson; Thomas M. Hill More than eight years since the death of Col. Muammar al-Qaddafi, Libya remains in state of protracted conflict with rival governments in Tripoli and Tobruk. Backed by the U.N., the Tripoli-based government has been at a stalemate with the eastern-based Libya Arab Armed Forces (LAAF) led Field Marshall Khalifa Haftar, who launched an assault on Tripoli in April. Foreign backers have flooded into the country to advance their own interests—but this has only exacerbated the conflict. Over the weekend, a long-delayed conference in Berlin aimed to put Libya on a path to peace and end foreign interference. USIP’s Nate Wilson and Tom Hill explain what happened at the conference, how the U.S. fits into this picture and where Libya’s conflict goes from here.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

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