To Honor Veterans, Bolster the Real Alternative to ‘Forever Wars’

To Honor Veterans, Bolster the Real Alternative to ‘Forever Wars’

Tuesday, November 9, 2021

By: James Rupert

Months after U.S. troops invaded Iraq in 2003, Army Colonel Paul Hughes quietly slipped out of the fortified U.S. headquarters in Baghdad’s “Green Zone” on a personal mission—to meet Iraqis and analyze the rising danger signs of disasters to come. American forces lacked a viable plan to stabilize this violent, trauma-scarred land, and Hughes’ nighttime conversations with Iraqis—scholars, business owners and former military officers—confirmed to him that the U.S. effort was dangerously isolated from Iraqi realities that would soon ignite an insurgency and eventually breed the Islamic State (ISIS) and a new war.

Type: Blog

Global Policy

As Libya Tries Peace, a Saharan City Builds It

As Libya Tries Peace, a Saharan City Builds It

Thursday, November 4, 2021

By: Nate Wilson;  USIP Staff

Over 200 Ubari residents gathered in September to formally inaugurate the open-air marketplace, which includes a community park for recreation. Local civil society groups helped develop it with support from USIP and funding from the United Nations’ World Food Program. A central marketplace—where many of Ubari’s 35,000 residents buy produce, household goods and other essentials—has always been a core of the city’s life and economy. But the old market was forced to close during a three-year surge in fighting between the area’s ethnic Tebu and Tuareg communities.

Type: Blog

Mediation, Negotiation & DialoguePeace Processes

Women Build Peace in Colombia’s Turbulent Pacific Region

Women Build Peace in Colombia’s Turbulent Pacific Region

Tuesday, October 5, 2021

By: Nicolas Devia-Valbuena;  Juan Carlos Ramirez;  Daniela Vargas

Colombia’s most violent region is its Pacific coast, where smaller rebel forces and criminal groups kill or abduct those who challenge their control. Across this mainly rural zone, young women peacebuilders are reducing violence in their communities and repairing social fabric torn by generations of bloodshed.

Type: Blog

Gender

Building a Peaceful Africa Through Arts, Culture and Heritage

Building a Peaceful Africa Through Arts, Culture and Heritage

Monday, July 26, 2021

By: Ambassador Makila James

Across the continent, Africans are increasingly using the arts to reimagine their world and reclaim public space to reflect on what a more peaceful and prosperous Africa could look like. Indeed, the African Union (AU) has prioritized art for only the second time in its history with its 2021 theme, “Arts, Culture and Heritage: Levers for Building the Africa We Want.” Leaders are hopeful that by channeling this surge in artistic expression, they can help create conditions to deliver peace to conflict-prone regions of the continent and implement the goals of the AU’s Agenda 2063 and the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals.

Type: Blog

Nonviolent Action

The Latest on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: 4 Key Issues

The Latest on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict: 4 Key Issues

Wednesday, June 23, 2021

By: Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen;  Ambassador Hesham Youssef

Recent events, including the turmoil in East Jerusalem and the 11-day war in Gaza, have forced the Israeli-Palestinian conflict back to the forefront of international attention. USIP’s Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen and Ambassador Hesham Youssef discuss big-picture trends they have been following, including shifting support for a two-state solution, the future of the Oslo framework, the role of the United States and the international community, and what might move the needle for peace.

Type: Blog

Peace Processes

Keeping Peacebuilding Education Alive During A Difficult Year

Keeping Peacebuilding Education Alive During A Difficult Year

Monday, June 7, 2021

By: Allison Sturma

In April, more than 400 U.S. high school students, representing 85 schools in 26 states, joined a Zoom call for what normally would be an in-person Academic WorldQuest — a quiz competition sponsored in part by USIP that’s dedicated to foreign policy, international issues, global conflict management and peacebuilding. Following the cancellation of the national competition in April 2020, there was uncertainty about what WorldQuest would look like going into 2021. While some deferred participation, others saw it as an exercise in seeing what was possible: In-person competitions were hoped for, but local groups experimented with virtual platforms; teachers figured out how to recruit teams and organize remote study sessions; and students made room for extra learning in shifting schedules. 

Type: Blog

Education & Training

Amid Pandemic, Virtual Peace Trail Demonstrates U.S. Commitment to Peace

Amid Pandemic, Virtual Peace Trail Demonstrates U.S. Commitment to Peace

Wednesday, June 2, 2021

By: Ann-Louise Colgan;  Ellie Quinlan

The last year was marked by disruption, with schools shuttered, workplaces closed and so many aspects of daily life altered by the pandemic. While COVID drastically reduced the number of tourists to the capital, too, that did not stop USIP from bringing Washington, D.C. to Americans through virtual options for visiting and experiencing the Peace Trail on the National Mall. The Peace Trail brings a “peace lens” to the experience of visiting the National Mall — elevating stories of key figures, institutions and moments in history that demonstrate America’s commitment to peace.

Type: Blog

Education & Training

Contested Citizenship Marginalizes Libya’s Vulnerable

Contested Citizenship Marginalizes Libya’s Vulnerable

Thursday, May 27, 2021

By: Ali Alansari;  Abigail Corey

After a decade of conflict, Libya has made welcome progress toward stability. A cease-fire inked in October 2020 paved the way for the establishment of an interim unity government tasked with preparing for national elections at the end of 2021. While these developments are cause for hope, numerous issues remain that could threaten long-team peace — including many people’s undetermined legal status. An estimated several hundred thousand people in Libya — even some born and raised in the country — lack proof of citizenship. Marginalized groups, such as those with disabilities, are among those most impacted by citizenship struggles. In this war-torn country, this is but another issue that exacerbates conflict and tension. 

Type: Blog

Human RightsPeace Processes

The Dilemma for Kenya’s Police Amid the Pandemic

The Dilemma for Kenya’s Police Amid the Pandemic

Wednesday, May 26, 2021

By: Rebecca Ebenezer-Abiola

From Nigeria to the United States and beyond, the added pressures of COVID-19 have pushed community-police relations to the breaking point as police have found themselves thrust to the frontlines of the coronavirus response. This issue has been particularly acute in Kenya, where police were tasked with new responsibilities without proper equipment or information. The resulting confusion has been a catalyst for increased tensions between the police and everyday Kenyans — including reports of violent and heavy-handed crackdowns from police.

Type: Blog

Global HealthJustice, Security & Rule of Law