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How the World Can Better Support Women Peacebuilders

How the World Can Better Support Women Peacebuilders

Monday, May 20, 2024

Whether it’s providing clean drinking water to displaced persons, organizing education for at-risk youth or directly engaging in mediation between warring parties, the 2023 Women Building Peace Award finalists have all shown themselves to be impactful advocates of peace and stability in their communities. USIP spoke to award recipient Pétronille Vaweka of the Democratic Republic of Congo and finalists Dr. Marie-Marcelle Deschamps of Haiti, Abir Haj Ibrahim of Syria and Hamisa Zaja of Kenya about their work and how the international community can help to empower and expand the critical efforts of women peacebuilders around the world.

Type: Blog

GenderPeace Processes

The Latest @ USIP: Unlocking Africa’s Development Potential

The Latest @ USIP: Unlocking Africa’s Development Potential

Tuesday, May 14, 2024

Despite Africa’s immense potential, the pace of development is not keeping up with Africans’ needs. This deficit has helped fuel a troubling rise in poverty, conflict and coups across the continent, all while global issues like climate change and strategic competition begin to take their own toll. USIP spoke with Afrobarometer’s Joe Asunka, Open Society Foundations’ Mooya Nyaundi and the Institute for Security Studies’ Jakkie Cillers at the Africa Futures Summit about the challenges facing the African continent — and how the international community can partner with African leaders to harness Africa’s development potential and promote stable, democratic governance.

Type: Blog

Democracy & GovernanceEconomics

The Untapped Potential of Grassroots Peacebuilding in Papua New Guinea

The Untapped Potential of Grassroots Peacebuilding in Papua New Guinea

Thursday, May 9, 2024

This past January, deadly riots in Papua New Guinea’s capital, Port Moresby, spilled over into other towns and cities across the nation. As the dust settled, many held the country’s struggling youth population responsible, at least partially, for kindling the widespread unrest. Papua New Guinea’s government responded by announcing ambitious plans to address a broad range of problems facing youth — a promising move.

Type: Blog

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Where is Gabon Headed After Its Coup?

Where is Gabon Headed After Its Coup?

Tuesday, May 7, 2024

Despite boasting one of the highest GDPs per capita in Africa, nearly two in five Gabonese live in poverty. That inequality — combined with decades of monolithic rule under the Bongo family — were contributing factors to Gabon’s military coup last August. USIP spoke with Charles M'bah, Gabon’s minister of public accounts, about what the people of Gabon expect from the current political transition and how the international community can help bolster Gabon’s democratic and economic development.

Type: Blog

Democracy & GovernanceEconomics

How Indigenous Practices Can Address Today’s Peacebuilding Challenges

How Indigenous Practices Can Address Today’s Peacebuilding Challenges

Tuesday, April 30, 2024

Too often, conventional peacebuilding not only overlooks Indigenous peoples — especially women — it dismisses Indigenous methods of building peace as well. But these methods are rooted in deep traditional practices that have a proven history of success. So, while they may differ from current approaches, Indigenous peacebuilding practices offer a chance to expand the peacebuilding field’s understanding and ability to resolve conflict. USIP spoke with several Indigenous leaders at the first Global Summit on Indigenous Peacebuilding about how Indigenous practices can contribute to current peace processes around the world.

Type: Blog

Peace Processes

The Latest @ USIP: Preventing Conflict Over Critical Minerals

The Latest @ USIP: Preventing Conflict Over Critical Minerals

Tuesday, April 23, 2024

Critical minerals underpin the world economy, powering everything from batteries and computers to the global energy transition. But, as a new USIP senior study group report reveals, competition over securing critical mineral supply lines can also upend stability and security in developing countries. Ambassador Dave Miller, president of the U.S. Diplomatic Studies Foundation, discusses how peace games offer U.S. and international policymakers a chance to practice strategies for preventing conflict — a skillset that will only become more valuable as demand for critical minerals increases.

Type: Blog

EnvironmentEconomics

The Latest @ USIP: Reclaiming Human Rights in Afghanistan

The Latest @ USIP: Reclaiming Human Rights in Afghanistan

Wednesday, April 17, 2024

Since taking power in 2021, the Taliban have imposed their own interpretation of Islamic law onto the people of Afghanistan and consistently rolled back human rights protections — especially for women and girls — all while the country struggles to recover from decades of conflict and economic crisis. USIP spoke with Fatima Gailani, the former president of the Afghan Red Crescent Society, about the various ways Afghans can put pressure on the Taliban to reclaim their rights and demand a better future.

Type: Blog

GenderHuman Rights

USIP Explains: Community Dialogue in Northern Sinjar

USIP Explains: Community Dialogue in Northern Sinjar

Thursday, April 11, 2024

Ten years after ISIS’ genocide against them, the wounds of the Yazidi community in Iraq’s Sinjar district remain fresh as thousands remain displaced and even more await justice for the crimes perpetrated against them. Meanwhile, despite living in peaceful coexistence prior to ISIS’ campaign, the conflict planted seeds of division among Sinjar’s various tribes and communities — resulting in tensions that threatened to tear the district apart even after ISIS’ defeat.

Type: Blog

Mediation, Negotiation & DialoguePeace Processes

The Latest @ USIP: How Civil Society is Addressing Haiti’s Crisis

The Latest @ USIP: How Civil Society is Addressing Haiti’s Crisis

Monday, March 25, 2024

In the past few years, life in Haiti has been dominated by gangs’ growing control over huge swathes of the capital, Port-au-Prince. For Haitian families, this crisis has meant extreme violence, pervasive unemployment, lack of education for children and reduced access to health care. 2023 Women Building Peace Award finalist Dr. Marie-Marcelle Deschamps serves as the deputy executive director, the head of the women's health program and the manager of the clinical research unit of GHESKIO Centers in Port-au-Prince. She spoke to USIP about how her work helps women and their families, and what the global community can do to help Haitian civil society address this devastating humanitarian crisis.

Type: Blog

Conflict Analysis & PreventionGender

The Latest @ USIP: Democratic Renewal in Africa

The Latest @ USIP: Democratic Renewal in Africa

Tuesday, March 19, 2024

Democracy remains quite popular throughout Africa. But many Africans see a mismatch between the promises of democratic governance and their leaders’ inability to address prolonged bouts of corruption, abuse and insecurity. This mismatch can often lead to a political culture that sees military coups as a viable alternative. Jide Okeke, regional coordinator for Africa at the U.N. Development Programme, discusses the risk factors that precipitate military coups, and the steps that regional and international actors can take to strengthen democratic governance and security.

Type: Blog

Democracy & Governance