The U.S.-China relationship is having an increasingly profound impact on the global economy and plays a crucial role in influencing the international order. The House of Representatives’ bipartisan U.S.-China Working Group provides a platform for frank and open discussions and educates members of Congress and their staffs. These congressional perspectives toward China have influence over U.S. policy and the bilateral relationship, particularly regarding oversight of the global coronavirus pandemic, implementation of phase one of the U.S.-China trade agreement, and Beijing’s imposition of a controversial new national security law in Hong Kong.

On July 8, USIP hosted the co-chairs of the U.S.-China Working Group, Rep. Rick Larsen (D-WA) and Rep. Darin LaHood (R-IL), for a conversation that explored key issues facing the U.S.-China relationship, shifting views in Congress on the topic, and the role of Congress in managing rising tensions and facilitating engagement between the two countries. 

Speakers

Rep. Rick Larsen (D-WA)
U.S. Representative from Washington
@RepRickLarsen

Rep. Darin LaHood (R-IL) 
U.S. Representative from Illinois 
@RepLaHood

The Honorable Nancy Lindborg, moderator
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace
@NancyLindborg

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