Doing more to prevent violent conflicts abroad — and doing it better — is an urgent U.S. government policy priority. From the Caucasus and Indo-Pacific to the Sahel and Horn of Africa, there is an increasing risk that regional wars could become flashpoints between great powers and spark a global conflagration. To address this challenge, the U.S. government is adopting a new policy that prioritizes preventing crises and promoting stabilization globally as a key part of the Global Fragility Act. Building on the lessons learned from Afghanistan and Iraq, this 2019 law is meant to improve U.S. capacity to prevent and stabilize violent conflicts abroad through better alignment of U.S. government agencies’ efforts. 

Join USIP as we host Rep. Sara Jacobs (D-CA) and Rep. Peter Meijer (R-MI), both members of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, for a conversation on how they are elevating the role of conflict prevention in U.S. foreign policy and ensuring that lessons from past U.S. stabilization missions are incorporated into future planning. They will also discuss how their past international experiences and current work in Congress are advancing U.S. interests in peace and security.

Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #BipartisanUSIP.

Speakers

Rep. Sara Jacobs (D-CA)
U.S. Representative from California
@RepSaraJacobs

Rep. Peter Meijer (R-MI)
U.S. Representative from Michigan 
@RepMeijer

Lise Grande, moderator
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

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