For over a decade, Russia’s Vladimir Putin has campaigned to subvert the liberal world order and undermine global norms by invading neighbors and interfering in democratic processes at home and abroad. Without strong leadership from an allied West to push back on Russian ambitions, the postwar order established by the United States and its allies is in jeopardy, and progress made over the last 70 years is at risk of being reversed. The United States must continue to lead on global issues, support democracy, uphold the rule of law, and push back on the disruptive ambitions of revisionist states like Russia.

As members of the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Europe, Eurasia and Emerging Threats, Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL) and Rep. Bill Keating (D-MA) discussed Congress’ efforts to counter Russian aggression at USIP’s fourth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue on Wednesday, June 20 from 9:00 – 10:00 a.m. Join the conversation on Twitter with #BipartisanUSIP

Speakers

Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL)
19th Congressional District of Florida, U.S. House of Representatives
@RepRooney

Rep. Bill Keating (D-MA)
9th Congressional District of Massachusetts, U.S. House of Representatives
@USRepKeating

Nancy Lindborg, moderator
President, U.S. Institute of Peace
@nancylindborg

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