Analysis and Commentary

Key Takeaways

  1. Next week’s summit is a chance for Americans and Africans to acknowledge the changes required to build a fully equal partnership to address our Africa-related challenges.
  2. A mighty U.S. engine for partnership with Africa, and simultaneously the heaviest tool in the pro-democracy toolbox, is investment and trade.
  3. U.S. and African leaders should begin shaping the structures of a formal partnership with the same seriousness as those of America’s transatlantic relationship with Europe.

Analysis and Commentary

Key Takeaways

  1. What’s urgently needed is a four-front, long-term strategy for helping Ukraine win the war against Russia and the peace that follows.
  2. The most important step Ukraine and the West can take to contribute to diplomacy is to support Ukraine’s war effort with military equipment, training and economic support.
  3. Washington should not be self-deterred by Russian nuclear threats.

Analysis and Commentary

Key Takeaways

  1. In nuclear-armed Pakistan, with the world’s fifth largest military and a history of military rule, the army chief tends to be the most powerful leader.
  2. Domestic politics, strategic stability in South Asia and the U.S.-China rivalry will immediately test Asim Munir as he takes the helm of Pakistan’s army.
  3. U.S. policymakers should proactively engage with him on the implications of his major foreign policy choices, particularly on Pakistan’s security ties with China.

Ask the Experts

USIP’s Andrew Cheatham spoke with Asle Toje, deputy leader of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, to discuss the definition of peace outlined by Alfred Nobel, the role of the United States as a constructive partner in the international community, and examples where “the American way of peace has been much more influential in delivering positive outcomes … than the American way of war.”

Watch the video
Svetlana Akimova shelters in a parking garage after heavy fighting took place outside her apartment building in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Saturday, Feb. 26, 2022. (Lynsey Addario/The New York Times)

Public Event

The History and Future of U.S. Sanctions Policy

Thursday, December 8 | 10:00am - 10:45am EST

Join USIP for a conversation with Stephen Rademaker and Stephen J. Hadley on the evolution of U.S. sanctions and how they can be used more effectively to resolve international conflicts without violence.