In this Pacific Century, the United States is a Pacific nation that for three generations has anchored peace in this region of the world. The Pacific Islands include 24 jurisdictions ranging from independent states, to states linked to the United States and others through free association compacts, to territories and dependencies stretching throughout Polynesia, Micronesia, and Melanesia—from Rapa Nui to Palau, from Hawai’i to New Caledonia. As the world turns its attention to the Pacific Islands, these countries are coalescing around a shared regional identity and bringing their economic, political, and security concerns to the global stage.

You will be able to participate in the live Q&A using the YouTube chat box function on the YouTube page. You can also take part in the conversation on Twitter using #BipartisanUSIP.

How do the United States and our allies and partners continue longstanding mutual interests and values with the Pacific Islands in the face of accelerating development needs and challenges to regional peace and security, sovereignty, trade and freedom of navigation, democracy, human rights, and the rule of law? 

On July 22, USIP hosted two co-founders of the bipartisan Congressional Pacific Islands Caucus for a discussion that outlined these challenges and opportunities, as well as their proposals to coordinate the next era of the United States’ engagement in the Pacific.

Speakers

Rep. Ed Case (D-HI)
U.S. Representative from Hawaii
@RepEdCase

Rep. Ted Yoho (R-FL)
U.S. Representative from Florida 
@RepTedYoho

The Honorable Nancy Lindborg, moderator
President, U.S. Institute of Peace
@NancyLindborg

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