America’s capacity to manage global challenges and advance its interests—amid pandemics, record levels of displacement, terrorism emanating from fragile states and a connected global economy—requires effective use of U.S. national security tools. To meet the challenges posed by the growing influence of China and Russia, U.S. diplomatic and development efforts must evolve and adapt to a complex 21st Century world while ensuring the effectiveness of resources and methods.

Rep. Ami Bera (D-CA) and Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-NY), leaders of the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, discussed how U.S. diplomacy and development are working to achieve America’s goals and adapt to the changing global landscape at USIP’s eighth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue. Rep. Bera is the chairman and Rep. Zeldin is the ranking member of the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee, which oversees U.S. diplomacy and development. Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #BipartisanUSIP.

Speakers

Rep. Ami Bera (D-CA)
U.S. Representative from California
@RepBera

Rep. Lee Zeldin (R-NY)
U.S. Representative from New York
@RepLeeZeldin

The Honorable Nancy Lindborg, moderator
President & CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace
@nancylindborg

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