In the weeks since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, policymakers and thought leaders have reflected on its implications for the global order, especially for the Indo-Pacific. Moreover, the invasion has prompted questions of how countries throughout the region perceive the likelihood of a similar armed conflict in Asia and the extent to which nations are postured to deter or respond to such a conflict, if necessary.

Many U.S. allies and partners in the Indo-Pacific have joined the United States and its European allies in condemning Moscow’s actions. From Japan to Singapore to New Zealand, countries have announced economic sanctions and export controls on Russia to hold Moscow accountable. Nonetheless, other regional actors, namely China, have thus far been unwilling to meaningfully respond to Russia’s attack against another sovereign nation.

On April 5, USIP hosted Rep. Ami Bera (D-CA) and Rep. Steve Chabot (R-OH) — the Chairman and Ranking Member of the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, Central Asia, and Nonproliferation — for a conversation on how the Russian invasion of Ukraine impacts the Indo-Pacific, as well as how the United States and its allies and partners can further support the Ukrainian people and deter a similar conflict in Asia.

Join the conversation on Twitter with #BipartisanUSIP

Speakers

Rep. Ami Bera (D-CA)
U.S. Representative from California
@RepBera

Rep. Steve Chabot (R-OH)
U.S. Representative from Ohio 
@RepSteveChabot

Lise Grande, moderator
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

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