The United States has classified the ongoing brutal oppression of Uyghurs and other ethnic minorities in China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) as a genocide based on extensive evidence of forced labor, mass internment, forced sterilization, rape and other abuses committed by the Chinese government. Congress has taken bipartisan action to hold China accountable by passing the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act in December 2021 to crack down on goods coming into the United States made with forced labor — but more is needed to curb abuses in the XUAR.

On July 15, USIP hosted Rep. Jennifer Wexton (D-VA), a member of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, and Rep. Young Kim (R-CA), vice ranking member of the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, Central Asia and Nonproliferation, for a discussion on the bipartisan congressional response to the Chinese government’s human rights abuses against Uyghurs and other ethnic minorities in the XUAR.

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #BipartisanUSIP

Speakers

Rep. Jennifer Wexton (D-VA)
U.S. Representative from Virginia 
@RepWexton

Rep. Young Kim (R-CA)
U.S. Representative from California
@RepYoungKim

Lise Grande, moderator
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

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