The evolution of U.S.-China relations over the last 40 years presents challenges that, if not properly managed, threaten American leadership in key places of strategic interest, from Asia to Africa to the Western Hemisphere. USIP hosted a Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue with two members of Congress who see tension rising as cooperation recedes and the People’s Republic of China increases its malicious activity in cyberspace, expands its military capabilities and presence around the globe, and uses economic tools to gain strategic leverage and undermine democracy in fragile states. 

Rep. Chris Stewart (R-UT) and Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD) are both members of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Agencies. Rep. Stewart also serves on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence and Rep. Ruppersberger was the first Democratic Freshman appointed to the Committee and concluded his service on the Committee as the Ranking Member. Both Representatives discussed Congress’ efforts to focus attention on China's military, diplomatic, and economic approaches around the globe at USIP’s sixth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue.

Join the conversation on Twitter with #BipartisanUSIP.

Speakers

Rep. Chris Stewart (R-UT)
U.S. Representative from Utah
@RepChrisStewart

Rep. Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD)
U.S. Representative from Maryland
@Call_Me_Dutch

Nancy Lindborg, moderator
President, U.S. Institute of Peace
@nancylindborg

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