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N. Carolina Students Connect with Ex-Secretary of State

N. Carolina Students Connect with Ex-Secretary of State

Thursday, May 25, 2017

By: Megan Chabalowski

News Type: Announcement

The 50 North Carolina high school students taking classes in “Global Issues” and “Global Cultures” hadn’t thought much about Europe as an issue that needed their attention. But that was before their teacher, Matt Cone, decided to ask a secretary of state for advice. Four months of research and 100 interviews later, the Carrboro High School students were asking questions about U.S. relations with Turkey, contentious elections in Europe, and the effect of globalization on jobs and trade.

Education & Training

The Lights Are Going Out In The Middle East - The New Yorker

Saturday, May 20, 2017

By: Robin Wright

News Type: USIP in the News

The world’s most volatile region faces a challenge that doesn’t involve guns, militias, warlords, or bloodshed, yet is also destroying societies. The Middle East, though energy-rich, no longer has enough electricity. From Beirut to Baghdad, tens of millions of people now suffer daily outages, with a crippling impact on businesses, schools, health care, and other basic services, including running water and sewerage. Little works without electricity.

Dr. Naysan Rafati on elections in Iran - SiriusXM POTUS

Wednesday, May 17, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

Dr. Naysan Rafati, TAPIR fellow at the United States Institute of Peace, spoke to SiriusXM POTUS Ch. 124 previewing the upcoming presidential elections in Iran between Hassan Rouhani and Ebrahim Raisi. Rafati explained that among the top issues for the candidates were the economy, unemployment, and corruption.

Crisis In South Sudan Merits A High-Level U.S. Envoy, Proponents Say - NPR

Sunday, May 14, 2017

News Type: USIP in the News

PRINCETON LYMAN: There are an awful lot of special envoys that have been named over the years. And many of them are subject matter, and they could be folded into the regular bureaucracy. But when you have a complicated conflict situation that covers a lot of different countries and requires virtually nonstop attention, that's where you use a special envoy.

Gandhara Podcast: Hekmatyar’s Return - Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

Thursday, May 11, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

Andrew Wilder, vice president of the Asia Program at the United States Institute of Peace, and Michael Kugleman, a South Asia specialist at the Wilson Center, shared insights from Washington. RFE/RL Media Manager Muhammad Tahir moderated our discussion from the same town. I contributed from Prague.

Flying Iran’s Friendly Skies to Victory - Foreign Policy

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

Perched on the tails of Iran Air’s aircraft is the mythical Persian bird known as the Homa. Versions of its legend describe how the Homa is periodically reborn, consuming itself in fire before rising reborn from the ashes. As Iran’s aviation sector makes moves for an epic overhaul, the mascot seems particularly appropriate.

William B. Taylor on Syria, Ukraine, and Russia - SiriusXM POTUS

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

William B. Taylor spoke to SiriusXM POTUS Ch. 124 about Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov’s meetings with Secretary of State Tillerson and President Trump. Among the top issues Taylor commented on were Syria, Ukraine and Russia’s interference in elections.

Lawmakers weigh new troops for America’s longest war - The Hill

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

Scott Worden, director of Afghanistan and Central Asia programs at the United States Institute of Peace, said maintaining or adding to the U.S. presence is worth the cost compared to what could happen if the U.S. pulled out.

U.S. poised to expand military effort against Taliban in Afghanistan - The Washington Post

Monday, May 8, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

“The review is an opportunity to send a message that, yes, the U.S. is going to send more troops, but it’s not to achieve a forever military victory,” said Andrew Wilder, an Afghanistan expert at the U.S. Institute of Peace. “Rather, it’s to try to bring about a negotiated end to this conflict.”