Error message

Gandhara Podcast: Hekmatyar’s Return - Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty

Thursday, May 11, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

Andrew Wilder, vice president of the Asia Program at the United States Institute of Peace, and Michael Kugleman, a South Asia specialist at the Wilson Center, shared insights from Washington. RFE/RL Media Manager Muhammad Tahir moderated our discussion from the same town. I contributed from Prague.

William B. Taylor on Syria, Ukraine, and Russia - SiriusXM POTUS

Wednesday, May 10, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

William B. Taylor spoke to SiriusXM POTUS Ch. 124 about Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov’s meetings with Secretary of State Tillerson and President Trump. Among the top issues Taylor commented on were Syria, Ukraine and Russia’s interference in elections.

Lawmakers weigh new troops for America’s longest war - The Hill

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

Scott Worden, director of Afghanistan and Central Asia programs at the United States Institute of Peace, said maintaining or adding to the U.S. presence is worth the cost compared to what could happen if the U.S. pulled out.

U.S. poised to expand military effort against Taliban in Afghanistan - The Washington Post

Monday, May 8, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

“The review is an opportunity to send a message that, yes, the U.S. is going to send more troops, but it’s not to achieve a forever military victory,” said Andrew Wilder, an Afghanistan expert at the U.S. Institute of Peace. “Rather, it’s to try to bring about a negotiated end to this conflict.”

ISIS is on the decline in the Middle East, but its influence in Pakistan is rising - The Washington Post

Friday, May 5, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

Security experts say that number is relatively low, especially when compared to the recruitment levels of more established terror groups like al-Qaeda or the Taliban. But they agree the threat to Pakistan is real and rising. "Clearly you can no longer say that the IS is not a problem," said Moeed Yusuf, an analyst at the United States Institute of Peace, a U.S. government-backed conflict resolution organization.

Meeting the Dalai Lama: My Reflection - Voices of Youth

Thursday, May 4, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

Last year, from 30th April to 6th May, 2016; I had the privilege of participating in the US Institute of Peace (USIP) Youth Leaders Exchange with the Dalai Lama in New Delhi and Dharamsala, India (along with 27 other youth leaders from India, Iraq, Syria, Pakistan, Somalia, Kenya, Nigeria, Sudan, South Sudan and Myanmar). The program aims to strengthen the capacity of youth leaders working to build peace in the world’s most violent countries.

USIP ‘Striking Success’ in Iraq

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

News Type: Announcement

Former U.S. military commanders in Iraq describe the U.S. Institute of Peace as a cost-effective “combat multiplier” with capabilities they “could not get elsewhere,” in an article published today in The National Interest.

Violent Extremism

Will the COINdinistas Rise Again? - The National Interest

Will the COINdinistas Rise Again? - The National Interest

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

By:

News Type: USIP in the News

By the end of our interview, Nagl was effusive. “USIP prevents wars from happening and ends them sooner, on terms more favorable to the United States. It keeps American soldiers alive,” he annunciated slowly. “USIP understands how wars end.”

William B. Taylor on Afghanistan and Iraq - SiriusXM POTUS

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

News Type: USIP in the News

William B. Taylor spoke to SiriusXM POTUS Ch. 124 about the long-term stabilization effort necessary in Afghanistan. Taylor underscored the need for a political component in the Afghanistan strategy that has been largely absent to date. Commenting on ISIS, Taylor said in both Iraq and Afghanistan that ISIS is on the defensive.

More security crises facing Trump - Newsday

Monday, May 1, 2017

By: Nancy Lindborg

News Type: USIP in the News

The first 100 days of a new presidency predictably deliver a foreign policy crisis, and President Donald Trump was tested, right on schedule. Events in Syria and North Korea were, unfortunately, unsurprising, even as Bashar Assad’s brutal gassing of his people (again) and the bellicosity of Pyongyang’s saber-rattling are no less chilling.