Generations of American leaders from across the political spectrum have supported the goal of a bipartisan foreign policy. The U.S. Institute of Peace, a congressionally funded national institute, advances this objective with a series of Bipartisan Congressional Dialogues. USIP brings together leaders from both political parties in public discussions to develop solutions for urgent national security and foreign policy problems.

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In each dialogue of the series, Republican and Democratic members of Congress discuss their shared interest in a specific foreign policy challenge and examine ways to address the problem with USIP leaders.

Generations of American leaders from across the political spectrum have supported the goal of a bipartisan foreign policy. USIP, a congressionally funded national Institute, advances this objective through a series of Bipartisan Congressional Dialogues. USIP brings together leaders from both political parties for public discussions to develop solutions to the nation’s most urgent national security and foreign policy challenges. In each dialogue of the series, Republican and Democratic members of Congress join USIP leaders to discuss their shared interest in a specific foreign policy challenge and examine ways to address the problem.

Bipartisan Congressional Dialogues have tackled such pressing national security topics as Russia’s role in Europe, negotiations with North Korea, democracy and women’s rights in Afghanistan, China’s growing international influence, ensuring effective diplomacy and development, and terrorism and evolving cybersecurity threats.

Past Events

Panel

Addressing China’s Economic and Military Coercion in the Indo-Pacific

June 21, 2019

Representatives Ed Case (D-HI) and John Rutherford (R-FL), members of the House Appropriations Committee, discussed how the U.S. can address China’s power projection and coercion in the Indo-Pacific at USIP’s ninth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue. Reps. Case and Rutherford are both members of the House Appropriations Military Construction and Veterans’ Affairs Subcommittee and recently traveled to the Indo-Pacific region.

Representatives Ami Bera (D-CA), left, and Lee Zeldin (R-NY), right, talk with U.S. Institute of Peace President Nancy Lindborg, May 10, 2019.

Diplomacy and Development in a Complex Global Landscape

May 10, 2019

Representatives Ami Bera (D-CA) and Lee Zeldin (R-NY), leaders of the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, discussed how U.S. diplomacy and development are working to achieve America’s goals and adapt to the changing global landscape at USIP’s eighth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue. Rep. Bera is the chairman and Rep. Zeldin is the ranking member of the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee, which oversees U.S. diplomacy and development. 

Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL), Nancy Lindborg, and Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA)

Soft Power in a Sharp Power World: Countering Coercion and Information Warfare

November 28, 2018

Former U.S. ambassadors Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL) and Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA) discussed their views on how soft power tools can and should be used to counter sharp power employed by global adversaries at USIP’s seventh Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue on Wednesday, November 28. Rep. Rooney is the vice chair of the House Foreign Affairs Committee and former U.S. ambassador to the Holy See. Rep. Beyer is the vice ranking member of the Science, Space and Technology Committee and former U.S. ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein. 

Chris Stewart (R-UT), Nancy Lindborg, and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD)

China: Managing Conflict and Competition

September 27, 2018

Representatives Chris Stewart (R-UT) and Dutch Ruppersberger (D-MD) discussed preserving U.S. national security interests with China’s growing international influence at USIP’s sixth Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue. Both representatives are members of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations and Related Programs. Stewart serves on the House Intelligence Committee and Ruppersberger is a former ranking member of the committee.

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Countering Illicit Funding of Terrorism: A Congressional Approach

April 17, 2018

Representatives Steve Pearce (R-NM) and Jim Himes (D-CT) discussed evolving cybersecurity threats to U.S. interests at USIP’s second Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue on a bipartisan approach to evolving cybersecurity threats. Representatives Pearce and Himes are both Members of the House Financial Services Subcommittee on Terrorism and Illicit Finance, and Representative Pearce is the Chairman of this Subcommittee.

Latest Publications

After Beirut Blast, What’s Next for Lebanon’s Broken Political System?

After Beirut Blast, What’s Next for Lebanon’s Broken Political System?

Friday, August 7, 2020

By: Dr. Elie Abouaoun; Mona Yacoubian

A massive explosion ripped through the Port of Beirut on Tuesday, sending shockwaves through the Lebanese capital, killing over one hundred and injuring thousands. This comes with Lebanon already on the brink of economic collapse, struggling to address a COVID outbreak, and as the trust gap between citizens and the state is wider than ever. Although in the immediate aftermath of the explosion some suggested Lebanon had been attacked, the cause of the explosion is likely much more banal: government negligence resulted in thousands of pounds of explosive chemical material to be improperly stored in the port for years. USIP’s Elie Abouaoun and Mona Yacoubian examine what this demonstrates about the already beleaguered Lebanese government, the long-term implications for the country, and how the international community has responded so far.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance

Disengagement and Reconciliation in Conflict-Affected Settings

Disengagement and Reconciliation in Conflict-Affected Settings

Friday, August 7, 2020

By: Leanne Erdberg Steadman

Even in brutal and desperate conflict settings, it is possible for people to abandon violence and leave violent groups. Peacebuilders know this well—yet terrorism and counterterrorism policies and practices have often neglected practical ways to address participants in violent extremism and failed to provide them opportunities to reject violence. This report examines how peacebuilding tools can help transform the individual attitudes, group relationships, and social ecosystems and structures needed to facilitate the effective disengagement and reconciliation of former members of violent extremist groups.

Type: Special Report

Violent Extremism

The Dangers of Myanmar’s Ungoverned Casino Cities

The Dangers of Myanmar’s Ungoverned Casino Cities

Thursday, August 6, 2020

By: Jason Tower; Priscilla A. Clapp

As a struggling, incomplete democracy, Myanmar and its elected leaders face challenges that would confound any country. The best-known involve the military’s uneven loosening of a 50-year dictatorship; ethnic tensions and armed conflicts; the lack of a common national identity; entrenched poverty; and the complications of borders with five nations, including China. Less well known is an emerging threat that touches each of these vital concerns. Over the past three years, transnational networks with links to organized crime have partnered with local armed groups, carving out autonomous enclaves and building so-called “smart cities” to tap into the huge, but illegal, Chinese online gambling market. Myanmar’s leaders at every level and in every sector should pay serious attention to the alarming national implications of these developments.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Economics & Environment; Democracy & Governance

Coronavirus Throws Another Challenge at Syria’s Doctors

Coronavirus Throws Another Challenge at Syria’s Doctors

Wednesday, August 5, 2020

By: Anthony Navone

As COVID starts to surge in Syria, the pandemic poses extraordinary challenges in one of the world’s most complex conflict zones. Nearly a decade of war has left Syria’s health care system in shambles. With supplies and trained personnel scarce, medical providers have struggled to meet the needs of millions of displaced Syrians. Meanwhile, medical workers have not been spared from the violence—despite international condemnation, health care facilities have been targeted by military strikes over 500 times since 2011.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Health

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