The U.S. Institute of Peace supports programs and research that contribute to the mission of promoting enduring peace in South Asia. The institute provides analysis, capacity development and resources to individuals and institutions working to prevent, mitigate, and resolve violent conflict. In Pakistan, USIP awards funding in three categories, ranging from projects that test new, experimental ideas to supporting local and international organizations on policy relevant research.

USIP Funding Pakistan Charter for Compassion Project
Volunteers with Charter for Compassion, a Pakistani civic organization supported by USIP, paint murals at a school in Karachi, Pakistan, as part of an activity to claim public space for peaceful and compassionate messages

The three types of funding are:

  • The Peace Innovation Fund, designed to support new, experimental ideas that test creative approaches to peacebuilding.
  • The Peacebuilding Practitioners’ Fund, which supports established civil society institutions.
  • The Peace and Conflict Research Fund, which advances the work of local and international partners conducting policy-relevant research and writing.

See below for more details. Apply at: pakistanpeacefund.com.

Peace Innovation Fund

The Peace Innovation Fund (PIF) supports new, experimental ideas that test creative approaches to peacebuilding in Pakistan. This is a micro-award fund that seeds innovations that are cost effective and have the potential to be expanded, if successful, on a larger scale.

PIF especially focuses on support for social entrepreneurs and small organizations. Typical awardees are grassroots activists, reformers, and social enterprises whose work or ideas ultimately can be sustained through local funding and recognition.

Themes supported under PIF:

  • Reclaiming public space for peaceful expression
  • Increasing tolerance for diversity

The best PIF projects have the following characteristics:

  • Local support
  • Program can be sustained when USIP funding ends
  • Cost-effective and scalable
  • Experimental and innovative
  • Generates learning and builds capacity for the field of peacebuilding

Peacebuilding Practitioners’ Fund

The Peacebuilding Practitioners’ Fund (PPF) seeks to support established civil society institutions working to prevent, mitigate, and resolve violent conflict in Pakistan. The fund is designed to: a) promote tolerance of diversity among the country’s political, ethnic and religious communities; and b) build the capacity of state and civil society institutions to prevent, mitigate, and resolve violent conflict.

PPF works with both for-profit and non-profit organizations that are legally registered in Pakistan. Typical awardees under PPF are civil society organizations or educational institutions with prior experience in peacebuilding and/or conflict resolution. They have strong local networks and have capacity to manage international donor funding. Projects under the PPF must have robust design, including a plan for monitoring and evaluation, and a sustainability strategy. 

Themes supported under PPF:

  • Promoting messages for peace and against political, religious, ethnic, or criminal violence through media, art, and technology.
  • Supporting peace education initiatives in public and private schools, madrassas, and institutions of higher education.
  • Supporting locally relevant ideas for facilitating and mediating inter-faith and intra-faith dialogue.
  • Amplifying the voice and role of women in peacebuilding and conflict resolution.
  • Developing guidelines and advocating for change that enhances the performance of the police and criminal justice system.

The best PPF projects have the following characteristics:

  • Likelihood of impact and an effective plan to measure results
  • Cost-effective and scalable
  • Program can be sustained when USIP funding ends
  • Generates learning and builds capacity for the field of peacebuilding

Peace and Conflict Research Fund

The Peace and Conflict Research Fund (PCRF) supports the work of local and international partners conducting policy-relevant research and writing on issues related to peace and conflict in Pakistan and the surrounding region. Studies carried out under the fund are intended to inform audiences in Washington, Islamabad, and around the world about the most critical factors contributing to violent conflict in Pakistan and the most important priorities to help mitigate or resolve those conflicts.

PCRF-supported studies are sometimes published through the auspices of the partner organization, or under one of three standard USIP publication formats - PeaceWorks (major 20,000-word studies of enduring relevance), Special Reports (standard 10,000-word issue studies), or PeaceBriefs (short 2,000-word policy memos). Book proposals are generally not supported at this time. To view recent USIP publications on Pakistan, please visit this link.

Typical awardees under the PCRF are practitioners or academics with an established record of concise, analytic writing for public policy audiences, but junior scholars and analysts are also encouraged to apply. Both desk-based research and field studies are supported by the PCRF.

Themes supported under PCRF:

  • Conflict drivers: Analysis focused on structural/political economy factors that can contribute to violent conflict in particular geographic regions or the country writ large.
  • Radicalization and violent extremism: Analysis focused specifically on understanding factors that drive individuals or groups to participate in violent conflict.
    • Specific issue priorities: Youth education and radicalization; sectarian conflict.
  • Regional conflict dynamics: Analysis focused on Pakistan’s political, security, economic, and environmental relations with its regional neighbors and international partners, and the impact on Pakistan’s internal and external security.
  • State security policy: Analysis focused specifically on the state response to internal and external security threats – how policy is made, assessing policies, and recommendations.
    • Specific issue priorities: counter-terrorism policy; policing, civil-military relations.
  • Governance and public policy: Analysis focused on Pakistan’s political dynamics and public policy issues, and how they impact conflict or external relations.
    • Specific issue priorities: Elections, political participation, and election violence; natural resources extraction, water- and energy service delivery, and associated conflict management practices.

The best PCRF projects have the following characteristics:

  • Rigorous analysis of factors contributing to peace or conflict in Pakistan
  • Lessons from field observation or practice (including comparative experience from other countries and contexts applied to Pakistan)
  • Clear and concise guidance for policymakers

Latest Publications

Keith Mines on Secretary Blinken’s Trip to Colombia

Keith Mines on Secretary Blinken’s Trip to Colombia

Thursday, October 21, 2021

By: Keith Mines

As Secretary of State Antony Blinken travels to Colombia, USIP’s Keith Mines notes there is still work to be done in implementing and expanding the 2016 peace agreement with the FARC insurgency, saying that “consolidating the peace in a place like Colombia was almost as hard as fighting the war itself.”

Type: Podcast

Global Policy

Iraq’s Election Raises More Questions Than Answers

Iraq’s Election Raises More Questions Than Answers

Thursday, October 21, 2021

By: Dr. Elie Abouaoun

Muqtada al-Sadr, a Shia cleric whose Mahdi Army followers battled U.S. forces during the years of the occupation, made big gains in Iraq’s parliamentary election on October 10. His victory could pose problems for the United States and Iran. But despite the Sadrist List’s electoral success, it is not a given that al-Sadr will be the next man to lead Iraq, or even be the only kingmaker. USIP’s Elie Abouaoun examines the outcome of the election, the electoral process and the implications for Iraq’s future.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance

 Une ville du Sahel conçoit un moyen d'améliorer les réformes – et l'aide internationale

Une ville du Sahel conçoit un moyen d'améliorer les réformes – et l'aide internationale

Friday, October 15, 2021

By: Jasmine Dehghan ; Sandrine Nama

La recrudescence cette année des troubles violents dans le Sahel en Afrique – des attaques djihadistes élargies, des coups d'État ou des tentatives militaires dans quatre pays, ainsi que le nombre constamment élevé de victimes civiles – souligne que des années de travail pour renforcer les forces militaires et policières n'ont pas réussi à réduire l'instabilité. Pour réduire l'extrémisme et la violence, les pays doivent améliorer la gouvernance, et des analyses récentes soulignent le besoin particulier de renforcer le sentiment des gens que leurs gouvernements peuvent assurer la justice et trouver des résolutions équitables aux griefs populaires. Un tel changement est une tâche extrêmement complexe et une ville du Burkina Faso a élaboré un plan de réformes locales avec un processus pour gérer cette complexité.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Democracy & Governance

A Sahel Town Builds a Way to Improve Reforms—and Foreign Aid

A Sahel Town Builds a Way to Improve Reforms—and Foreign Aid

Thursday, October 14, 2021

By: Jasmine Dehghan; Sandrine Nama

This year’s escalation of violent turmoil in Africa’s Sahel—widened jihadist attacks, military coups or attempts in four nations, and continued high civilian casualties—underscores that years of work to reinforce military and police forces have failed to reduce instability. To undercut extremism and violence, countries must improve governance, and recent analyses underscore the particular need to build people’s confidence that their governments can provide justice and fair resolutions of popular grievances. Such change is an immensely complex task—and one town in Burkina Faso has shaped a plan for local reforms with a process to manage that complexity.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Democracy & Governance

In Africa, U.S. Should Focus More on Democracy, Less on China

In Africa, U.S. Should Focus More on Democracy, Less on China

Thursday, October 14, 2021

By: Thomas P. Sheehy; Paul Nantulya; Gustavo de Carvalho

Even as the United States draws lessons from its unsuccessful, 20-year effort to build a sustainable peace in Afghanistan, it is shaping policies to engage the political and economic rise of Africa. Both the shortcomings in Afghanistan and the opportunities of Africa underscore the imperative of building policy on a full appreciation of local conditions. Yet on Africa, China’s growing presence has seized Americans’ political attention, and scholars of African politics say this risks distracting near-term U.S. policymaking. A requisite for U.S. success in Africa will be to focus on Africans’ desires—which include an ambition to build their futures by democratic means.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy; Democracy & Governance

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