Lyndi Tsering is a program specialist on the China team at USIP. Her work focuses on U.S.-China relations, China and the world, and Indo-Pacific foreign policy.

She previously served as the research analyst for diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility in the Africa Center at USIP. Prior to that, she researched with the German Marshall Fund of the United States and the Project 2049 Institute. Her additional experiences include internships with the State Department and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, time in Taiwan and Italy, and work as a dialogue facilitator for the Lab for Global Performance and Politics.  

Tsering holds a master’s degree in Asian studies with a concentration in politics and security from Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. She also holds a bachelor’s degree in international relations from Wheaton College. She is proficient in Mandarin and possesses basic proficiency in Tibetan.   
 

Publications By Lyndi

Biden and Xi at APEC: Averting Further Crisis in U.S.-China Relations

Biden and Xi at APEC: Averting Further Crisis in U.S.-China Relations

Thursday, November 16, 2023

By: Carla Freeman, Ph.D.;  Rosie Levine;  Ryan Sung;  Lyndi Tsering

President Joe Biden and Chinese leader Xi Jinping spoke for several hours on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit this week in San Francisco. After several years of deteriorating relations — and frozen communication — between Washington and Beijing, Biden characterized the talks as the “most constructive and productive” since he came to office. But the increasing strategic competition between the two powers leaves major issues still to be addressed, such as China’s aggression in the South China Sea and Taiwan Strait, BRICS expansion, nuclear security, and the wars in Ukraine and the Middle East.

Type: Analysis

Global Policy

As China Looks to Reform Global Governance, How Does It Approach the U.N.?

As China Looks to Reform Global Governance, How Does It Approach the U.N.?

Thursday, September 28, 2023

By: Carla Freeman, Ph.D.;  Lyndi Tsering

As China has increasingly positioned itself as a global leader and foremost champion of the Global South, Xi Jinping and other top Communist Party officials have been vociferous in their critiques of the U.S.-led international order. Through a bevy of initiatives and proposals — like Xi’s Global Security Initiative — offered in recent years, Beijing has made clear that it wants to see a wholesale reform of global governance. At the June 2022 BRICS summit, for example, Xi called for a “new type of international relations” that rejects hegemony and zero-sum thinking. What this ultimately amounts to is Beijing’s effort to undermine U.S. global leadership as the U.S.-China rivalry intensifies.

Type: Analysis

Global Policy

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