Adam Gallagher is the managing editor for Public Affairs and Communications at the U.S. Institute of Peace.

Most recently he was an editorial manager at the International Foundation for Electoral Systems and was previously with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s Middle East Program. Gallagher has also worked as an analyst and writer at a defense consultancy monitoring local and international media reporting on Afghanistan. He has been an accredited election observer in Tunisia (2014), Burma (2015) and Liberia (2017).

His writing on U.S. politics, foreign policy and international relations has appeared in the Washington Post, the Hill, the National Interest, World Politics Review, the American Prospect, Small Wars Journal, the Diplomat, the Huffington Post, International Policy Digest, and for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the Urban History Association, among other outlets.

He has a bachelor’s degree in political science and philosophy from Ohio Northern University and a master’s degree in international relations from George Mason University.

Publications By Adam

Negotiations Are the Only Way to End Afghan Conflict, Says Abdullah

Negotiations Are the Only Way to End Afghan Conflict, Says Abdullah

Thursday, June 25, 2020

By: Adam Gallagher

The head of Afghanistan’s new peace council said yesterday that he is optimistic that intra-Afghan talks can start in the coming weeks, but increased levels of violence and details of prisoner releases may slow the start of talks. Chairman Abdullah added that the government’s negotiating team will be inclusive and represent common values in talks with the Taliban. The team “will be diverse and represent all walks of life,” Abdullah said. Afghans and analysts have expressed concern that without an inclusive negotiating team, the country’s hard-won, democratic gains could be compromised for the sake of a deal with the Taliban.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance; Peace Processes

In Casamance, Dialogue Helps Battle Coronavirus and Build Trust

In Casamance, Dialogue Helps Battle Coronavirus and Build Trust

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

By: Anthony Navone; Adam Gallagher

The Casamance region of Senegal has been wracked by conflict since 1982, when an insurgency sought independence over social and cultural grievances with the Senegalese government. Nearly four decades later, the unresolved conflict has frayed the relationship between security forces and Casamance’s citizens, disintegrating the trust that once existed. But, this March, as the coronavirus was spreading around the globe, dialogues between youth leaders, security forces, civilian authorities, and other local stakeholders in the town of Goudomp helped to rebuild ties between security forces and the community and foster cooperation to combat COVID-19.

Type: Blog

Global Health; Justice, Security & Rule of Law

Tunisia’s Citizens and Security Forces Come Together to Combat Coronavirus

Tunisia’s Citizens and Security Forces Come Together to Combat Coronavirus

Thursday, April 23, 2020

By: Adam Gallagher

As COVID-19 began to sweep the globe, the Tunisian government implemented strict measures to stem the spread of the virus, knowing the country’s underprepared health system would be overwhelmed by a widespread outbreak. Beginning on March 17, authorities enforced a 12-hour curfew. Days later, 400 were arrested for breaking that curfew. “Anyone who breaks the security rules will be treated as a criminal because failing to respect rules within the context of the pandemic is a crime,” said Interior Minister Hichem Mechichi. Many Tunisians have bristled at what they see as an overly securitized response.

Type: Blog

Democracy & Governance; Global Health; Youth

U.S.-Taliban Deal is a “Massive Opportunity,” Says U.S. Negotiator

U.S.-Taliban Deal is a “Massive Opportunity,” Says U.S. Negotiator

Thursday, February 20, 2020

By: Adam Gallagher

After a year and a half of negotiations, the U.S. and Taliban have reached an interim agreement to reduce violence for a period of seven days. If that agreement holds, the two sides will formalize a pact that would lead to intra-Afghan negotiations and a phased U.S. troop withdrawal. Although the reduction in violence is an important achievement, it is but one step on a long, rocky road to peace, noted current and former senior U.S. officials on February 18 at the U.S. Institute of Peace.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Peace Processes

Five Myths About Protest Movements

Five Myths About Protest Movements

Tuesday, December 17, 2019

By: Maria J. Stephan; Adam Gallagher

This year saw protests across the globe, as citizens bridled under what they consider the tyranny of their governments. From Iraq to Zimbabwe, Hong Kong to Chile, demonstrators even in places with ample surveillance and retributive regimes have worked to make their voices heard. But alongside these movements, misconceptions about how they work persist—and plague our understanding of their goals, their methods and their outcomes.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Nonviolent Action

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