Adam Gallagher is the managing editor for Public Affairs and Communications at the U.S. Institute of Peace.

Most recently he was an editorial manager at the International Foundation for Electoral Systems and was previously with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s Middle East Program. Gallagher has also worked as an analyst and writer at a defense consultancy monitoring local and international media reporting on Afghanistan. He has been an accredited election observer in Tunisia (2014), Burma (2015) and Liberia (2017).

As a freelance writer, his work on U.S. politics, foreign policy and international relations has appeared in the Hill, the National Interest, World Politics Review, the American Prospect, the Diplomat, the Huffington Post, International Policy Digest, and for the Carnegie Endowment and the Urban History Association, among other outlets.

He has a bachelor’s degree in political science and philosophy from Ohio Northern University and a master’s degree in international relations from George Mason University.

Publications By Adam

North Korea and the Fine Print of a Deal

North Korea and the Fine Print of a Deal

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

By: Adam Gallagher

With significant uncertainty surrounding the proposed Trump-Kim summit scheduled for June 12 in Singapore, South Korean President Moon Jae-in is in Washington this week to ensure the historic meeting happens. Whether its sanctions relief or appropriating peacebuilding funds, the U.S. Congress will play a pivotal role in any settlement with North Korea. Amid questions about Pyongyang’s intent and past negotiating behavior, Steve Russell (R-OK) and Congressmen Ted Lieu (D-CA), both military veterans, offered their support for the Trump administration’s participation in the summit during a bipartisan dialogue at the U.S. Institute of Peace.

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

Evolving Cybersecurity Threats Require Bipartisan Approach

Evolving Cybersecurity Threats Require Bipartisan Approach

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

By: Adam Gallagher

We live in an age of immense technological innovation and disruption. While these technologies make our lives easier, criminal groups and terrorist networks have the tools to exploit them, as policymakers struggle to keep up with rapid pace of change. Terrorist groups like the Islamic State and rogue regimes like North Korea employ these technologies to illicitly finance their operations, often using cryptocurrencies in order to evade detection. Despite the partisan rancor in Washington, Republican and Democrat members of Congress are coming together to counter illicit financing and wrestle with these emerging policy challenges.

Economics & Environment; Global Policy; Violent Extremism

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