The Gender Inclusive Framework and Theory (GIFT) guide is an approachable and thorough tool that facilitates the integration of gender analysis into project design. Because peacebuilding work is context dependent, the GIFT puts forth three approaches to gender analysis – the Women, Peace and Security Approach; the Peaceful Masculinities Approach; and the Intersecting Identities Approach – that each illuminate the gender dynamics in a given environment to better shape peacebuilding projects.

Introduction: Designing Gender Inclusive Projects

Violent conflict upends and often polarizes societies—it disrupts social structures, especially men’s and women’s roles and the relationships between them. In fragile and conflict-affected environments, peacebuilding practitioners must address the drivers and consequences of violent, fragmented societies. The increasing militarization of young men is one such driver, and widespread sexual violence effects all in a society, even well after violence has ceased. Yet gender analysis is neither considered nor integrated into much of the project design for conflict prevention and mitigation work. Gender inclusive project design is essential to forming the best approaches for preventing violent conflict and maintaining peace—it is not secondary and should not be an afterthought.1 The Gender Inclusive Framework and Theory (GIFT) is a simple but thorough approach to begin integrating gender analysis into project design.

The GIFT Will

  • Define gender;
  • Describe the relationship between gender and conflict dynamics and its importance to peacebuilding;
  • Explore a theory of change and an analysis framework for gender inclusion; and
  • Provide specific guidance on integrating gender into project design.

Notes

Nora Dudwick and Kathleen Kuehnast, “Gender and Fragility: Ensuring a Golden Hour,” Fragility Study Group Policy Brief no. 8 (Washington DC: US Institute of Peace, November 2016), .

Related Publications

If we want to build peace, we can’t keep women out.

If we want to build peace, we can’t keep women out.

Thursday, October 18, 2018

By: Danielle Robertson; Tabatha Thompson

When nations affected by violent conflict try to make peace, the evidence is clear on what works. For a durable peace agreement, women must be included throughout the process. While the U.N. Security Council unanimously endorsed that goal in 2000, women still are excluded from peace processes. Among 504 peace accords signed by 2015, only 27 percent even mentioned women. A U.N. study of 14 peace processes from 2000 to 2010 found that women comprised only 8 percent of negotiators and 3 percent of signatories.

Gender; Peace Processes

A New Afghan Law Preserves ‘Virginity Tests’ for Women

A New Afghan Law Preserves ‘Virginity Tests’ for Women

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

By: Marjan Nahavandi; Muzhgan Yarmohammadi

Afghanistan this year adopted a new penal code that moves the country toward meeting international standards on criminal justice. At the same time, it underscores the continued difficulties of reinforcing rights for Afghan women and girls. One reflection of this is its preservation of the discredited practice of “virginity testing”—a decision that Afghan women increasingly have opposed.

Gender

Our Dangerous Children: The Global Risks of Neglect

Our Dangerous Children: The Global Risks of Neglect

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

By: Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.

Intermittently, images spring from the news to shock us with the suffering of children brutalized by war or their families' desperate flight as refugees. Three years ago, the body of Alan Kurdi, a Syrian boy drowned on a Turkish beach, administered that shock. Central American children uprooted by the violence of Honduras or El Salvador now underscore the same message—that amid the world's people scarred by war and violence, a special danger is children. Among the 65 million people torn from their homes, most by warfare, roughly half are children.

Gender; Global Policy; Youth

View All Publications