Danielle Robertson is the senior gender specialist in the Center for Policy, Learning and Strategy at USIP. In this role, Danielle develops tools and facilitates trainings on gender inclusion in peacebuilding. She also serves as a project design specialist with a specific focus on integrating gender analysis in project design. Danielle joined USIP’s gender and peacebuilding program in 2014 to coordinate the work of the U.S. Civil Society Working Group on Women, Peace and Security, and leverage their expertise to support implementation efforts on gender policy frameworks. Before joining USIP, she worked for American University's School of International Studies to develop and manage training courses for graduate students in the International Peace and Conflict Resolution program. Danielle’s research interests include understanding the impact of conflict-related sexual violence on communities and how policy and programming can better address the root causes that drive its use during conflict. She holds a master’s degree in International Peace and Conflict Resolution from American University and graduated summa cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in International Development from Pennsylvania State University.

Publications By Danielle

If we want to build peace, we can’t keep women out.

If we want to build peace, we can’t keep women out.

Thursday, October 18, 2018

By: Danielle Robertson; Tabatha Thompson

When nations affected by violent conflict try to make peace, the evidence is clear on what works. For a durable peace agreement, women must be included throughout the process. While the U.N. Security Council unanimously endorsed that goal in 2000, women still are excluded from peace processes. Among 504 peace accords signed by 2015, only 27 percent even mentioned women. A U.N. study of 14 peace processes from 2000 to 2010 found that women comprised only 8 percent of negotiators and 3 percent of signatories.

Gender; Peace Processes

Gender Inclusive Framework and Theory

Gender Inclusive Framework and Theory

Thursday, August 23, 2018

By: Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.; Danielle Robertson

The Gender Inclusive Framework and Theory (GIFT) guide is an approachable and thorough tool that facilitates the integration of gender analysis into project design. Because peacebuilding work is context dependent, the GIFT puts forth three approaches to gender analysis – the Women, Peace and Security Approach; the Peaceful Masculinities Approach; and the Intersecting Identities Approach – that each illuminate the gender dynamics in a given environment to better shape peacebuilding projects.

Gender

Women Charting a New Course on Peace and Security

Women Charting a New Course on Peace and Security

Tuesday, March 1, 2016

By: Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.; Danielle Robertson

The fact that Afghanistan’s parliament has 69 female members, 27 percent of the total, illustrates the advances, albeit still tenuous, that are possible with determined efforts to support the protection and empowerment of women. At the same time, women worldwide still suffer disproportionately from conflict and violent extremism. In the run-up to International Women’s Day on March 8, USIP has collected statistics and the observations of global leaders to illustrate hard-won achievements and the devastating gaps that remain.

Gender; Human Rights; Justice, Security & Rule of Law

South Sudanese, Rwandans Share Stories of Resilience in Search of Hope

South Sudanese, Rwandans Share Stories of Resilience in Search of Hope

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

By: Nicoletta Barbera; Danielle Robertson

Twenty years after the genocide, Rwanda is often seen as an example of reconciliation and social reintegration. Reminders of the systemic violence perpetrated by the government that began in 1992, in addition to the 100 days of genocide in 1994, are barely visible at the surface. But University of Rwanda lecturer Alice Karekezi notes that “the Rwandan people still carry the scars of war.”  And it is still considered taboo to discuss ethnicity in public. But dialogue clubs have emerged in comm...

Gender

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