The RESOLVE Network is a global consortium of researchers, research organizations, policymakers, and practitioners committed to empirically driven, locally defined research on the drivers of violent extremism and sources of community resilience.

About

International stakeholders established RESOLVE to generate, facilitate, aggregate, and synthesize methodologically sound, locally informed research on the dynamics of violent extremism.

RESOLVE is a resource hub for researchers, practitioners, and policymakers in need of nuanced, multidisciplinary, empirical approaches to analyze the drivers of violent extremism and sources of community resilience. RESOLVE’s work provides key insights on violent extremism by establishing connections and asking critical questions to enhance and inform preventing and countering violent extremism (P/CVE) research, policy, and practice.

The RESOLVE Network Secretariat manages RESOLVE’s suite of research projects, convening efforts, and Network activities. The Secretariat is housed at the U.S. Institute of Peace, building upon the Institute’s decades-long legacy of deep engagement in conflict-affected societies.

Vision

Better research. Informed practice. Improved policy on violent extremism.

Mission

RESOLVE provides insights into violent extremism around the world, elevates local, rigorous research, and networks the research, policy, and practice communities.

Network

The RESOLVE Network comprises of Member Organizations and the Research Advisory Council. Populated by leading experts and scholars in the field, the RESOLVE Network Research Advisory Council supports RESOLVE’s mission to develop and deliver high-quality, methodologically rigorous research and insights on violent extremism.

Research

RESOLVE partners with international stakeholders on research and convening projects that build connections, ask critical questions, elevate research findings, and inform P/CVE research, policy, and practice. RESOLVE publications provide insight on global and local dynamics of violent extremism, identify gaps in the literature for future research, and present actionable recommendations for local and international actors. Our thematic and regional research initiatives include:

Convenings

RESOLVE hosts public events and expert roundtables to highlight new insights and research findings, convenes regional research agenda setting working groups and trainings, and connects local research organizations and researchers with P/CVE stakeholders.

Our signature event, the annual RESOLVE Network Global Forum at the U.S. Institute of Peace, is a hub of expertise for professionals in preventing and countering violent extremism and an entry point of multidisciplinary knowledge and innovation into mainstream P/CVE efforts.

For more information, subscribe to our newsletter and follow us on Twitter at @resolvenet

Related Publications

Getting to the Source: The Importance of Field Research

Getting to the Source: The Importance of Field Research

Wednesday, April 7, 2021

By: Alastair Reed; Boglarka Bozsogi

Travel restrictions and social distancing practices put in place in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have largely ground field research to a halt. Fieldwork plays an essential but often underappreciated role in both understanding violent extremism and developing policy responses to it. It is vital, therefore, that funders and policymakers support the return of such important work in a post-pandemic world.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Education & Training

2020 Trends in Terrorism: From ISIS Fragmentation to Lone-Actor Attacks

2020 Trends in Terrorism: From ISIS Fragmentation to Lone-Actor Attacks

Friday, January 8, 2021

By: Alastair Reed; Kateira Aryaeinejad

In the past five years, terrorist attacks have declined notably around the globe. While this is certainly good news—particularly in the 20th year of the so-called global war on terror—terrorism remains a pervasive threat. Despite declines in its prevalence, the scale of the challenge posed by terrorism and the violent ideologies that underpin it is still immense and the mechanisms by which to address it remain complex and in need of further coordination on a global scale. What trends did we see in 2020? And how can those trends inform policy to counter violent extremism?

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Violent Extremism

USIP’s Work on Violent Extremism

USIP’s Work on Violent Extremism

Sunday, December 1, 2019

Despite countless lives lost and trillions of dollars spent, violent extremism continues to evolve and spread. Addressing this complex, global phenomenon with roots in local contexts continues to be a top priority of USIP.

Type: Fact Sheet

Violent Extremism

View All

Latest Publications

Beyond Security: The Quest for a Sustained, Strategic U.S.-Iraq Partnership

Beyond Security: The Quest for a Sustained, Strategic U.S.-Iraq Partnership

Thursday, July 29, 2021

By: Sarhang Hamasaeed

On Monday, President Joe Biden received Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi at the Oval Office to strengthen bilateral relations and discuss matters of mutual interest, key among them being the future of U.S. troops in Iraq. Despite widespread thinking that Iraq and the Middle East do not rank high in the mix of the Biden administration’s priorities, there have been clear signals that Iraq remains important enough to the United States and that Kadhimi and his government are partners that the United States can work with and should support. While most of the media attention focused on the announcement of the change in U.S. force posture in Iraq, the key takeaway from this week’s meeting is that the United States and Iraq seek to maintain their strategic partnership — and build on it.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy; Fragility & Resilience

Taliban’s Violent Advances Augur Bleak Future for Afghan Women

Taliban’s Violent Advances Augur Bleak Future for Afghan Women

Thursday, July 29, 2021

By: Belquis Ahmadi

Mere days after the United States failed to meet the May 1 troop withdrawal deadline stipulated in its 2019 deal with the Taliban, the militant group began launching major attacks on Afghan security forces and taking control of administrative districts. While disputed, some estimates suggest the Taliban now have control of half of the districts across the country. The violence has already wrought a heavy toll — and women and girls have borne the early brunt.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Gender; Violent Extremism

Five Key Considerations To Make the U.S. Global Fragility Strategy Work

Five Key Considerations To Make the U.S. Global Fragility Strategy Work

Wednesday, July 28, 2021

By: Corinne Graff; Tyler Beckelman

Even as the public debate over the U.S. military withdrawal from Afghanistan continues, the State Department and USAID are quietly putting plans in place to test a new approach to con-flicts overseas. Drawing on the hard-earned lessons from Afghanistan and Iraq over the past two decades, this approach would have the United States rely far less on military power and far more on sustained — but much less costly — diplomacy and closely coordinated development investments. If fully implemented, consistent with the recently enacted Global Fragility Act, this new effort promises to help stabilize countries in their recovery from COVID-19 and the knock-on shocks to their economies. 

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & Resilience; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

At 70, Refugee Convention Faces Many Challenges, Says Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield

At 70, Refugee Convention Faces Many Challenges, Says Ambassador Thomas-Greenfield

Wednesday, July 28, 2021

By: Ashish Kumar Sen

Seventy years after its ratification, the Convention of Refugees remains an important pillar of the international system. Every day, conflict, hunger, economic deprivation and climate change are forcing people around the world to flee their homes in search of a better life. It is critical, therefore, that the international community uphold their obligations under the convention, while elevating efforts to address the root causes of migration, according to U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas-Greenfield.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Human Rights; Global Policy

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