The RESOLVE Network  is a global consortium of researchers and research organizations in agreement that factors contributing to community vulnerability and resilience to violent extremism are contextual.

Origins

International stakeholders launched the Researching Solutions to Violent Extremism (RESOLVE) Network in September 2015 during a summit held on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. The primary goal of the Network is to generate, facilitate, aggregate, and synthesize methodologically sound, locally informed research on the drivers of vulnerability and sources of resilience to violent social movements and extremism.

Vision

Leveraging locally-informed research and analysis to illuminate drivers of violent extremism and identify solutions.

Mission

Connect, capture, curate, and catalyze locally informed research on violent extremism to promote effective policy and practice.

Structure

The United States Institute of Peace hosts the RESOLVE Network Secretariat at its headquarters in Washington, DC. The Network is primarily supported by its Steering Committee, Secretariat, Strategic Network Partners, and Honorary Partners.

Partners

Visit our website or email partnerships@resolvenet.org to learn more about RESOLVE partnerships and how to become a member of the Network.

Objectives

  • Catalyze collaboration between organizations and individuals around the world to leverage locally informed research to identify effective responses to violent extremism;
  • Support the aggregation and synthesis of data, analysis, best practices and tools to address violent extremism through the establishment of a shared Knowledge Platform;
  • Grow the cadre of local researchers and expand their capacity to leverage methodologically sound analysis to influence policy and practice and to connect and train future generations of researchers, practitioners, and thought leaders;
  • Facilitate comprehensive identification of knowledge gaps on the dynamics of violent extremism
  • Enhance the understanding of indicators and drivers of violent extremism;
  • Facilitate the development of a shared research agenda in response to policymakers’ and practitioners’ needs to address the problem of violent extremism
  • Connect people working on common themes to create a community of practice that will help support local research and link that research to policymakers and practitioners;
  • Support the development of quality, evidence-based local research and program evaluation and practice evaluation and;
  • Disseminate analysis and research findings to policymakers and practitioners at all levels, from the local to the international.

Resolve in the News

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Contact Us

resolve@resolvenet.org
www.resolvenet.org

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