The RESOLVE Network is a global consortium of researchers and research organizations in agreement that factors contributing to community vulnerability and resilience to violent extremism are contextual.

Origins

International stakeholders launched the Researching Solutions to Violent Extremism (RESOLVE) Network in September 2015 during a summit held on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. The primary goal of the Network is to generate, facilitate, aggregate, and synthesize methodologically sound, locally informed research on the drivers of vulnerability and sources of resilience to violent social movements and extremism.

Vision

Leveraging locally-informed research and analysis to illuminate drivers of violent extremism and identify solutions.

Mission

Connect, capture, curate, and catalyze locally informed research on violent extremism to promote effective policy and practice.

Structure

The United States Institute of Peace hosts the RESOLVE Network Secretariat at its headquarters in Washington, DC. The Network is primarily supported by its Steering Committee, Secretariat, Strategic Network Partners, and Honorary Partners.

Partners

Visit our website or email partnerships@resolvenet.org to learn more about RESOLVE partnerships and how to become a member of the Network.

Objectives

  • Catalyze collaboration between organizations and individuals around the world to leverage locally informed research to identify effective responses to violent extremism;
  • Support the aggregation and synthesis of data, analysis, best practices and tools to address violent extremism through the establishment of a shared Knowledge Platform;
  • Grow the cadre of local researchers and expand their capacity to leverage methodologically sound analysis to influence policy and practice and to connect and train future generations of researchers, practitioners, and thought leaders;
  • Facilitate comprehensive identification of knowledge gaps on the dynamics of violent extremism
  • Enhance the understanding of indicators and drivers of violent extremism;
  • Facilitate the development of a shared research agenda in response to policymakers’ and practitioners’ needs to address the problem of violent extremism
  • Connect people working on common themes to create a community of practice that will help support local research and link that research to policymakers and practitioners;
  • Support the development of quality, evidence-based local research and program evaluation and practice evaluation and;
  • Disseminate analysis and research findings to policymakers and practitioners at all levels, from the local to the international.

Resolve in the News

Contact Us

resolve@resolvenet.org
www.resolvenet.org

Related Publications

ISIS Determined to Make a Comeback—How Can it Be Stopped?

ISIS Determined to Make a Comeback—How Can it Be Stopped?

Thursday, August 13, 2020

By: Ashish Kumar Sen

The Islamic State (ISIS), which was driven from its strongholds in Syria and Iraq over a year ago, is determined to regain territory in the region. It will take a combination of military and financial pressure, attention to public grievances, and the repatriation and rehabilitation of people who lived or fought with ISIS—as well as those who were subjugated by them—to foil the militant group’s ambitions, according to senior U.S. officials. This already tall ask has been made even more challenging by the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Violent Extremism

Disengagement and Reconciliation in Conflict-Affected Settings

Disengagement and Reconciliation in Conflict-Affected Settings

Friday, August 7, 2020

By: Leanne Erdberg Steadman

Even in brutal and desperate conflict settings, it is possible for people to abandon violence and leave violent groups. Peacebuilders know this well—yet terrorism and counterterrorism policies and practices have often neglected practical ways to address participants in violent extremism and failed to provide them opportunities to reject violence. This report examines how peacebuilding tools can help transform the individual attitudes, group relationships, and social ecosystems and structures needed to facilitate the effective disengagement and reconciliation of former members of violent extremist groups.

Type: Special Report

Violent Extremism

Violent Extremist Disengagement and Reconciliation: A Peacebuilding Approach

Violent Extremist Disengagement and Reconciliation: A Peacebuilding Approach

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

By: Chris Bosley

Existing efforts to disengage people from violent extremism are derived from security imperatives rather than from a peacebuilding ethos. This report—one of a series to be published by USIP’s program on violent extremism—presents a framework through which peacebuilders can foster disengagement from violent extremism and reconciliation between those disengaging and affected communities by examining the individual, social, and structural dynamics involved.

Type: Peaceworks

Violent Extremism

The Implications of the Assassination of Husham al-Hashimi

The Implications of the Assassination of Husham al-Hashimi

Thursday, July 16, 2020

By: Dr. Elie Abouaoun

The assassination of our colleague and friend Husham al-Hashimi by unidentified gunmen in Iraq comes as a shock to those who knew him, and to those who did not. Not because assassinations in Iraq are unfamiliar, but rather for other reasons, the most important being Husham’s personality, his experience, ethics, and dedication to the cause of peace in his country; also because of the optimism felt by many after Mustafa al-Kadhimi took over as prime minister and the measures he undertook.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Violent Extremism

View All Publications