Andrew Cheatham is a senior advisor for global policy.

He is a lawyer and former United Nations official with a history of success working in international affairs in highly complex conflict and crisis environments in the Middle East and Africa. He is experienced in institutional problem-solving on issues of rule of law, transitional justice, human rights, peace process support, program management, strategic communications, policy advisory services and risk management.

Cheatham holds a law degree from City University New York School of Law, a master’s in war studies and counterterrorism from King's College London, a bachelor’s in mass communications from Boston University and a certificate in negotiation from Harvard Law School. He is a regular guest lecturer at King’s College London and a non-resident fellow at the Seton Hall University Center for Peace and Conflict Studies.

Publications By Andrew

Ask the Experts: The Genocide Convention 75 Years On

Ask the Experts: The Genocide Convention 75 Years On

Thursday, December 14, 2023

By: Andrew Cheatham;  Ambassador David Scheffer

Since the Genocide Convention was introduced 75 years ago, the crime of genocide has become so well known and so well understood that the international backlash is nearly instantaneous — and holding perpetrators accountable for this crime is foundational to many international judicial systems, from the tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda in the 1990s to the prosecution of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia. USIP’s Andrew Cheatham spoke with David Scheffer, the former U.S. ambassador at-large for war crimes issues and professor at Arizona State University, about the history of the Genocide Convention and the mechanisms by which genocide and other atrocity crimes are prosecuted.

Type: Blog

Human Rights

In a Multipolar World, the Private Sector Can Be a Force for Peace

In a Multipolar World, the Private Sector Can Be a Force for Peace

Monday, November 6, 2023

By: Andrew Cheatham

As the world transitions to a more multipolar, competitive landscape, this is an important moment to take stock of the role of the private sector, particularly multinational enterprises, in the genesis and resolution of armed conflict. Today, the world’s biggest corporations are wealthier than many nations and the private sector is playing an increasingly important role in geopolitics. At the same time, we are seeing a rise in violence and conflict that threatens to pose major risks to business around the world.

Type: Analysis

Conflict Analysis & PreventionEconomics

Ask the Experts: How Post-War Commemorations Can Impact Peace

Ask the Experts: How Post-War Commemorations Can Impact Peace

Monday, October 23, 2023

By: Andrew Cheatham;  David Wood

The current approach to peacebuilding tends to focus on the drivers of conflict — by understanding what’s causing violence, mechanisms can be put in place to stop it. But that is only one part of peacebuilding, and a current dilemma facing the field is how to navigate the emotional aftermath of a conflict, where the warring parties might have different recollections and understandings of historical events. USIP’s Andrew Cheatham spoke with Seton Hall University Professor David Wood, the co-author of the “Ethics of Political Commemoration: Towards a New Paradigm ” who is also a senior researcher at Geneva Graduate Institute, about how this issue manifests in the practice of post-war commemorations and what the peacebuilding field can do to facilitate commemorations in a way that is more likely to lead to a peaceful future.

Type: Blog

Peace Processes

Amid Alarming Rise in Conflict, Multilateralism is the Only Answer

Amid Alarming Rise in Conflict, Multilateralism is the Only Answer

Wednesday, September 27, 2023

By: Andrew Cheatham

At the opening of the 2023 session of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA), Secretary-General António Guterres highlighted for world leaders the preamble of the organization’s Charter, which says that the “people of the United Nations” are “determined to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war.” Yet, he explained that “instead of ending the scourge of war, we are seeing a surge of conflicts, coups and chaos.” Indeed, in 2022, there were 55 state-based and 82 non-state conflicts raging around the world, and the period from 2017 to 2021 saw the highest death tolls from non-state actors in armed conflict since 1989.

Type: Analysis

Global Policy

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