Andrew Cheatham is a senior expert working in the executive office of USIP.

He is a lawyer and former United Nations official with a history of success working in international affairs in highly complex conflict and crisis environments in the Middle East and Africa. He is experienced in institutional problem-solving on issues of rule of law, transitional justice, human rights, peace process support, program management, strategic communications, policy advisory services and risk management.

Cheatham holds a law degree from City University New York School of Law, a master’s in war studies and counterterrorism from King's College London, a bachelor’s in mass communications from Boston University and a certificate in negotiation from Harvard Law School. He is a regular guest lecturer at King’s College London and a non-resident fellow at the Seton Hall University Center for Peace and Conflict Studies.

Publications By Andrew

Regional Security Support: A Vital First Step for Peace in Mozambique

Regional Security Support: A Vital First Step for Peace in Mozambique

Thursday, June 23, 2022

By: Andrew Cheatham;  Amanda Long;  Thomas P. Sheehy

Over the last year, Mozambique has seen a marked improvement in security conditions in its troubled Cabo Delgado region. The military intervention of Southern African Development Community (SADC) member states and Rwanda has disrupted an Islamist insurgency that emerged in 2017 and has since inflicted an enormous toll on the region. Security in key areas of Cabo Delgado and neighboring provinces has stabilized, giving the Mozambican government — and its international backers — an opportunity to foster reconciliation leading to an enduring peace. The Mozambican government should immediately take advantage of this exceptional regional commitment, which won’t last forever.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

Is ‘Neutralization’ Obsolete After the Ukraine War?

Is ‘Neutralization’ Obsolete After the Ukraine War?

Thursday, June 2, 2022

By: Andrew Cheatham

In the immediate aftermath of Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine, some observers speculated that Kyiv could agree to terms of “neutralization” as part of a peace agreement. That notion, however, has been discarded in the intervening months, as Russia’s brutality and war crimes have led to both Ukraine and the international community hardening their stance on the contours of a peace agreement. Sweden and Finland have even decided to abandon their decades of neutrality and applied to join NATO. Will the Russia-Ukraine war be the death knell of neutralization?

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global PolicyPeace Processes

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