Andrew Cheatham is a senior expert working in the executive office of USIP.

He is a lawyer and former United Nations official with a history of success working in international affairs in highly complex conflict and crisis environments in the Middle East and Africa. He is experienced in institutional problem-solving on issues of rule of law, transitional justice, human rights, peace process support, program management, strategic communications, policy advisory services and risk management.

Cheatham holds a law degree from City University New York School of Law, a master’s in war studies and counterterrorism from King's College London, a bachelor’s in mass communications from Boston University and a certificate in negotiation from Harvard Law School. He is a regular guest lecturer at King’s College London and a non-resident fellow at the Seton Hall University Center for Peace and Conflict Studies.

Publications By Andrew

Ask the Experts: What Drives Papua New Guinea’s Fragility?

Ask the Experts: What Drives Papua New Guinea’s Fragility?

Wednesday, November 16, 2022

By: Andrew Cheatham

The island nation of Papua New Guinea (PNG) struggles from a range of factors that exacerbate its fragility, from intercommunal violence to the potential secession of the autonomous Bougainville region to its inability to hold safe and credible elections. Sexual- and gender-based violence against women also runs rampant in the country. While the PNG state is weak and garners little trust from the people, there are critical civil society actors working to address the country’s instability and mitigate violence.

Type: Blog

Fragility & Resilience

Ask the Experts: What Drives Libya’s Fragility?

Ask the Experts: What Drives Libya’s Fragility?

Monday, October 31, 2022

By: Andrew Cheatham

Libya has been trapped in cycles of violence and political instability since the 2011 revolution. Competing factions within Libya’s political, business and military elite have spent the last decade alternating between violent conflict and ineffective power-sharing agreements. Meanwhile, foreign powers have interfered in pursuit of their own geopolitical agendas, undermining international mediation efforts by the United Nations and others. USIP’s Andrew Cheatham spoke with two Libya experts to discuss what’s behind the country’s protracted fragility crisis and how Libya can move toward peace and democratic governance.

Type: Blog

Fragility & Resilience

Ask the Experts: What Drives Haiti’s Fragility?

Ask the Experts: What Drives Haiti’s Fragility?

Thursday, October 20, 2022

By: Andrew Cheatham

While governance and economic issues have long plagued the country, Haiti’s instability has only accelerated since the assassination of President Jovenel Moïse in July 2021. Today, Haiti is experiencing a full-scale humanitarian crisis, with nearly half the population not having enough to eat. The U.N. has called for rapid action, and the United States has included Haiti in its list of priority countries under the Global Fragility Act. USIP’s Andrew Cheatham spoke with several Haiti experts about the structural and security challenges Haiti faces and possible solutions going forward.

Type: Blog

Fragility & Resilience

Regional Security Support: A Vital First Step for Peace in Mozambique

Regional Security Support: A Vital First Step for Peace in Mozambique

Thursday, June 23, 2022

By: Andrew Cheatham;  Amanda Long;  Thomas P. Sheehy

Over the last year, Mozambique has seen a marked improvement in security conditions in its troubled Cabo Delgado region. The military intervention of Southern African Development Community (SADC) member states and Rwanda has disrupted an Islamist insurgency that emerged in 2017 and has since inflicted an enormous toll on the region. Security in key areas of Cabo Delgado and neighboring provinces has stabilized, giving the Mozambican government — and its international backers — an opportunity to foster reconciliation leading to an enduring peace. The Mozambican government should immediately take advantage of this exceptional regional commitment, which won’t last forever.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

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