After unveiling a new regional strategy last summer that included additional commitments of forces to Afghanistan and a promise to “no longer be silent” on disputes with Pakistan over militant sanctuaries on its territory, the Trump administration began the year with an announcement that it was suspending military assistance to Pakistan. What are the pros and cons and likely results of the administration’s approach to Pakistan, and how are Pakistani leaders responding to increased U.S. pressure?

On February 12 at the U.S. Institute of Peace, regional experts assessed the current state of U.S.-Pakistan relations and discuss how the United States’ security concerns in the region are likely to shape future ties. Review the conversation on Twitter with #USPakWhatsNext.

Speakers

Andrew Wilder, moderator
Vice President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Tanvi Madan
Director, Brookings Institute India Project

Ambassador Richard Olson
Former Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan

David Sedney
Senior Associate, International Security Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies

Moeed Yusuf
Associate Vice President, U.S. Institute of Peace

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