Lauren Baillie is the senior program officer on atrocity prevention at USIP. She leads a program that explores the intersections between atrocity prevention and cross-cutting criminal justice reform issues, including countering violent extremism, combatting corruption and transnational organized crime, and promoting women, peace, and security. In partnership with the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, she works to develop a comprehensive curriculum on atrocity prevention for practitioners in the justice and security sectors.

Baillie joined USIP after 10 years with the Public International Law & Policy Group (PILPG), where she served most recently as vice president and senior counsel.

During her time with PILPG, she worked extensively on accountability and transitional justice in conflict and post-conflict settings, including South Sudan, Iraq, Syria, Libya, and Kosovo. Her expertise includes human rights documentation, design of responsive transitional justice mechanisms, women’s participation in peace and transitional justice processes, justice sector accountability, and strategic litigation as a tool to promote accountability. She has field experience in Libya, Kosovo, South Sudan, and Tanzania. Prior to PILPG, Baillie worked with the United States Agency for International Development and the Brookings Institution.

Baillie received her Juris Doctor from American University’s Washington College of Law, a master’s in international affairs from The George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs, and a bachelor’s in political science from Yale College.

Publications By Lauren

Will the Ukraine War Renew Global Commitments to the International Criminal Court?

Will the Ukraine War Renew Global Commitments to the International Criminal Court?

Thursday, April 28, 2022

By: Lauren Baillie

The international response to Russia’s February 2022 invasion of Ukraine has resulted in the highest level of support for the International Criminal Court (ICC) since its creation 20 years ago. Forty-three states parties to the Rome Statute, the ICC’s foundational treaty, have referred the conflict to the Court for investigation. States — both state parties and non-state parties to the Rome Statute — have stepped up to support investigative efforts through financial resources and intelligence.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global PolicyHuman RightsJustice, Security & Rule of Law

How to Achieve Accountability for Atrocities in Ukraine

How to Achieve Accountability for Atrocities in Ukraine

Thursday, April 21, 2022

By: Lauren Baillie

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has resulted in a remarkable alignment of international actors supporting accountability processes. The international community — states, regional bodies, civil society and the U.N. — has provided funding and expertise to the Ukrainian government and launched documentation and evidence collection efforts, fact-finding missions and criminal investigations into Russia’s invasion and the crimes committed against Ukrainian civilians. The progress made to date stands to advance the rights of Ukrainians and other vulnerable communities faced with aggressive state action. Moving forward, this united effort will require the coordination, creativity and sustained political will to ensure that perpetrators are held accountable, and that justice is delivered to victims.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Human RightsJustice, Security & Rule of LawGlobal Policy

Ukraine: Justice for War Crimes Must Begin with Evidence

Ukraine: Justice for War Crimes Must Begin with Evidence

Thursday, April 7, 2022

By: Lauren Baillie

Photos and reporting emerging following the withdrawal of Russian forces from towns near Kyiv have triggered global revulsion, notably at the apparent summary execution of civilians. This initial evidence strongly suggests that Russian behavior in towns like Bucha and Irpin amounts to the widespread, systematic violence against civilians typical of atrocity crimes. World leaders have condemned the violence as war crimes, urging investigations and accountability. Ensuring eventual accountability for perpetrators and justice for victims means governments and others must quickly support the essential first step: the broadest possible collection of evidence.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & PreventionGlobal Policy

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