The departure of international combat troops in 2014 left Afghanistan with a struggling economy and a fragile security environment. Today, bad governance, corruption, and insurgent havens in Pakistan fuel a continuing conflict. The U.S. Institute of Peace works with the Afghan government and civil society organizations to address underlying causes of instability by strengthening the rule of law, countering violent extremism, expanding peace education, and promoting better governance and anti-corruption efforts. USIP also supports policy-relevant research on current causes of conflict in Afghanistan. Learn more in USIP’s fact sheet on The Current Situation in Afghanistan.

Featured Publications

Illegal Extraction of Minerals as a Driver of Conflict in Afghanistan

Illegal Extraction of Minerals as a Driver of Conflict in Afghanistan

Monday, July 24, 2017

By: Sadaf Lakhani ; Julienne Corboz

Based on qualitative surveys and focus group discussions with communities in four Afghan provinces, this Peace Brief analyzes how nonstate actor control over small-scale mining sites and illegal extraction contributes to conflict, the local political economy, and the incentive structures that support illegal extraction.

Economics & Environment; Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Democracy & Governance

Political Stability in Afghanistan: A 2020 Vision and Roadmap

Political Stability in Afghanistan: A 2020 Vision and Roadmap

Monday, July 10, 2017

By: Alex Thier ; Scott Worden

Sixteen years after the start of the international intervention in Afghanistan, the country remains beset by a debilitating array of conflicts, undermined political stability, an economic and security decline since the withdrawal of a majority of international forces, and a divided government since the 2014 elections. As the US government, its partners, and NATO consider...

Democracy & Governance; Fragility and Resilience; Global Policy

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Current Projects

Peace Education in Afghanistan

Peace Education in Afghanistan

Afghanistan’s next generation of leaders have an opportunity to break out of the cycles of violence that have caused civil wars, insurgencies, and widespread human rights abuses and domestic violence over the past decades.  To do this, government officials and community leaders need to have practical skills to identify sources of conflict and know how to de-escalate tensions and negotiate peaceful solutions.

Youth; Democracy & Governance; Gender; Violent Extremism

Rule of Law in Afghanistan

Rule of Law in Afghanistan

The United States Institute of Peace (USIP) has been working since 2002 to strengthen the rule of law in Afghanistan by identifying peaceful means of dispute resolution, developing partnerships between state and community actors, and improving access to justice. USIP’s work has included learning through research and pilot projects, grant-making, and technical support to the Afghan government, Afghan communities, and international partners. With a Kabul-based field office, USIP has conducted r...

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

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