After over a year of intensive talks, press reports indicate that an official agreement between the U.S. and Taliban is imminent. The agreement reportedly begins with an immediate reduction in violence by all sides, followed by the signing of a U.S.-Taliban agreement. This would lead to intra-Afghan peace negotiations, accompanied by a gradual withdrawal of U.S. troops. Implementing and verifying each step in this process will require meticulous diplomacy, but this reported agreement could mark a major turning point in the effort to end the war in Afghanistan.

On February 18, USIP brought together a panel of former U.S. government senior officials to discuss the significance of the reported agreement, the potential for a sustainable and inclusive peace process, and what this latest development means for bringing an end to the eighteen-year war in Afghanistan.

Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #AfghanPeace.

Speakers

Ambassador Molly Pheewelcoming remarks
Deputy Special Representative for Afghanistan Reconciliation, former U.S Ambassador to South Sudan

The Honorable Stephen J. Hadley
Chair, Board of Directors, U.S. Institute of Peace; former National Security Adviser 

The Honorable Michèle Flournoy
Co-Founder and Managing Partner, WestExec Advisors

Ambassador Richard Olson, moderator
Senior Advisor, U.S. Institute of Peace; former U.S. Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan

Scott Smith, welcoming remarks
Senior Advisor, U.S. Institute of Peace

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