Five years after ISIS’ genocidal campaign in Iraq, Yazidis and other religious minorities are struggling to recover from the trauma of occupation and the heinous crimes committed by the terrorist group. Sinjar, a district in the Nineveh province of Iraq, remains in ruins while many of its residents are still displaced and trying to cope with the aftermath of mass killing, rape, abduction, and enslavement. On June 28, USIP, in partnership with the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office, will host Nobel Peace Prize laureate Nadia Murad, a leading advocate for survivors of genocide and sexual violence, to discuss her work to help Iraq recover, the plight of the Yazidi people, and stabilization and resilience in the country.

While the international community has provided much needed assistance, key challenges to post-conflict stabilization in Sinjar’s towns and villages persist, complicating efforts to rebuild communities, seek accountability and justice, foster local reconciliation, and help Yazidis and other displaced communities return home safely. Murad launched an initiative to address some of these challenges and help rebuild communities. In support of this initiative, the government of Taiwan, a member of the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS, has recently announced it will contribute to stabilization and humanitarian assistance efforts. Join the conversation with #NadiaMuradUSIP.

Speakers

Dr. Michael Yaffe, welcoming remarks
Vice President, Middle East and Africa Center, United States Institute of Peace

Nadia Murad, keynote speaker
Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Founder and President of Nadia’s Initiative, and United Nations Goodwill Ambassador for the Dignity of Survivors of Human Trafficking
@NadiaMuradBasee, @nadiainitiative

Ambassador Kelley E. Currie 
Office of Global Criminal Justice, Department of State

The Honorable Stanley Kao 
Representative of Taiwan
@TECRO_USA 

Knox Thames
Special Advisor for Religious Minorities in the Near East and South/Central Asia, U.S. Department of State
@KnoxThames 

Sarhang Hamasaeed, moderator
Director, Middle East Programs, United States Institute of Peace
@sarhangsalar

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