Afghanistan’s 40-year conflict has entered a new and potentially final phase. A real opportunity to reach a peaceful resolution now exists, and the United States can play a key role in determining whether this opportunity is realized. A responsible and coherent set of U.S. actions could greatly increase the chances of a sustainable peace agreement. But a rash and rushed approach could further prolong this long and tragic war—with negative consequences for the region and heightened threats to the security and interests of the United States and its allies.

Over 10 months, the Afghanistan Study Group explored options for effective U.S. action in Afghanistan. The bipartisan study group, convened by USIP at the request of Congress, brought together distinguished experts and former policymakers to develop policy recommendations that consider how a peace settlement—or the failure to reach one—could affect Afghanistan’s future as well as U.S. resources and commitments in the region.

On February 3, USIP hosted the co-chairs of the Afghanistan Study Group for a discussion of the group’s findings and the report’s recommendations for how the United States can fully align our policies, practices, and messaging across diplomatic, military, and assistance efforts toward the overarching goal of achieving a durable and just peace in Afghanistan. 

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #AfghanistanStudyGroup.

Agenda

Welcome

  • The Honorable Stephen J. Hadley
    Chair, Board of Directors, U.S. Institute of Peace

Framing Remarks and Moderated Discussion

  • Senator Kelly A. Ayotte
    Co-Chair, Afghanistan Study Group 
  • General Joseph F. Dunford, Jr.
    Co-Chair, Afghanistan Study Group
  • The Honorable Nancy Lindborg
    Co-Chair, Afghanistan Study Group 
  • David Ignatiusmoderator
    Columnist, The Washington Post

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