The congressionally mandated Afghanistan Study Group (ASG) was charged with identifying policy recommendations that “consider the implications of a peace settlement, or the failure to reach a settlement, on U.S. policy, resources, and commitments in Afghanistan.” After ten months of extensive deliberations and consultations, the ASG submitted its report containing forward-looking recommendations to Congress, the Biden administration, and the public. The co-chairs discussed their key findings and recommendations at a public event on February 3, 2021.

The ASG is a 15-member bipartisan/nonpartisan group that is co-chaired by Kelly Ayotte, former U.S. senator (R-NH); Joseph Dunford, former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; and Nancy Lindborg, former USIP president and CEO. Its members bring a diversity of strategic and practical knowledge including economic, military, diplomatic, social, and geopolitical expertise, as well as experience across large and complex organizations and processes.

A senior advisors group was also appointed by the ASG co-chairs. The senior advisors offer deep subject-matter expertise spanning a range of specialties. They shared their insights and provided analysis on topics addressed by the ASG. They also presented their findings to the study group members on specific issues.

The ASG also consulted with key external stakeholders, including regional partners, multilateral institutions, and civil society groups, as well as the private sector, and representatives of the administration and Congress, for briefings and discussion.

Final Report Release

webcast panel

Afghanistan Study Group Releases Final Report

Webcast Event

View the webcast featuring the co-chairs of the Afghanistan Study Group in a dicussion of the study group’s findings and the report’s recommendations. moderated by David Ignatius. 

House Committee on Oversight and Reform Hearing 

"A Pathway for Peace in Afghanistan: Examining the Findings and Recommendations of the Afghanistan Study Group"

Secretariat

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