In the midst of a political shift where power is moving from central institutions to smaller, more distributed units in the international system, the approaches to and methodologies for peacemaking are changing. "Managing Conflict in a World Adrift" provides a sobering panorama of contemporary conflict, along with innovative thinking about how to respond now that new forces and dynamics are at play.

"Managing Conflict in a World Adrift," the fourth volume in the landmark series edited by Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson, and Pamela Aall, is the follow-on to "Leashing the Dogs of War," the definitive text on the sources of conflict and solutions for preventing and managing conflict. Forty of the most influential analysts of international affairs present varied perspectives and insightful thinking to inform a new framework for understanding current demands of conflict management.

“I hope emerging generations of students and practitioners will plunge into this volume, wrestle with the leading ideas, argue and debate the premises of the diverse authors, and keep the faith with the profession of peacemaking.”—Martti Ahtisaari

The authors examine the nature of the relationship between political, social, or economic change and the outbreak and spread of conflict. They also consider the consequences of these factors for conflict management.

Emerging systemic and societal transformations call for the kind of fresh thinking and approaches to peacemaking featured in "Managing Conflict in a World Adrift." Crocker, Hampson, and Aall bring together leading authorities in the field to guide students and practitioners of international relations and conflict management in a time when world order is ambiguous and asymmetrical. Peacemakers of today and tomorrow will gain from this text a broad and deep understanding of the current situation, along with the strategies and skills needed to prevent and resolve conflict.

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