A 2016 peace agreement between Colombia’s government and the country’s biggest rebel group is being fulfilled in stages. As the guerrillas transition to civilian life, Colombia faces a massive task of reconciliation to recover from a half-century conflict that killed more than 220,000 people and uprooted more than 6 million. The U.S. Institute of Peace helped prepare the ground for a political solution with more than a decade of work in Colombia, and now is supporting research, policy discussions and mediation between, for example,  ex-combatants and victims, to prevent a resurgence of violence. Learn more in USIP’s fact sheet on the Current Situation in Colombia.

Featured Publications

Inclusive Peace Processes Are Key to Ending Violent Conflict

Inclusive Peace Processes Are Key to Ending Violent Conflict

Friday, May 5, 2017

By: Colette Rausch; Tina Luu

Violent conflict, refugee flows, and internal displacements present international policymakers and practitioners today with unprecedented challenges. Tackling these problems requires not only signed peace agreements but also sustainable peace. It is not enough to bring armed actors to the negotiating table, however. To be effective, the peace process needs to be inclusive and participatory. But what constitutes inclusive participation, and how can peacemakers and peacebuilders achieve it in their own, very different societies? Drawing on discussions in a public forum held in early 2017, this Peace Brief looks at the elements of peacebuilding and explains how critical inclusive participation is to that process.

Peace Processes

The Current Situation in Colombia

The Current Situation in Colombia

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

After more than 50 years, one of the world’s longest-running wars is close to being ended. Colombia’s government and rebels of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC-EP) signed a peace accord in August following years of talks in Havana. Colombian voters narrowly rejected the accord amid a low referendum turnout in October, but both sides vowed to renew talks and avoid a return to bloodshed. The U.S., which invested about $10 billion in strengthening Colombian security forces to def...

U.S. National Security Chiefs Talk Leadership, Partners

U.S. National Security Chiefs Talk Leadership, Partners

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

By: USIP Staff

The national security advisors to President Barack Obama and President-elect Donald Trump stood shoulder-to-shoulder on a stage at the U.S. Institute of Peace yesterday and shook hands to a standing ovation at a two-day conference on foreign and national security policy. In speeches, National Security Advisor Susan Rice and her designated successor, retired U.S. Army Lieutenant General Michael Flynn, struck a tone of cooperation on the transition between administrations.

Global Policy

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Current Projects

Colombia Peace Forum

Colombia Peace Forum

Established with the peace talks in 2012, the USIP-based Colombia Peace Forum produces creative analysis of Colombia’s internal armed conflict and peace initiatives that informs the thinking of policymakers and opinion leaders in the United States and Colombia. The forum convenes academics, Colombia specialists, government officials and others to provide a platform where a variety of voices, including historically marginalized groups (human rights defenders, women, ethnic minorities, etc.), c...

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Peace Processes

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