Working in partnership with the Institute for the Study of International Migration (ISIM) at Georgetown University, USIP offered a two-day seminar as part of ISIM´s training program for managers of humanitarian operations.

Working in partnership with the Institute for the Study of International Migration (ISIM) at Georgetown University, USIP offered a two-day seminar as part of ISIM´s training program for managers of humanitarian operations. The program prepared participants for senior management responsibilities in the fields of international humanitarian assistance and disaster response.

USIP´s seminar focused on enhancing core skills for humanitarian managers in the areas of communication, negotiation, and mediation. The nineteen participants represented major international NGOs and UN agencies such as CARE, the World Health Organization, the World Food Program, UNFPA, the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA/UNAMA), International Rescue Committee (IRC), Mercy Corps, and Catholic Relief Services (CRS). Adding to the diversity of the program, participants came from many countries, including the U.S., El Salvador, Kenya, Egypt, Nepal, Guinea, Ireland, Burundi, Finland, Australia, Zambia, Cote d ´Ivoire, Indonesia, the Netherlands, Croatia, and Afghanistan.

All participants were experienced humanitarian professionals, most of whom had worked in the field and in managerial positions for more than a decade. Participants praised USIP´s approach to training, noting that "the interactive nature of the sessions made it effective." Participants also enjoyed the seminar format, which gave them opportunities to analyze, practice, and reflect: "The first day introduced me to the theory of negotiations, while the second provided an opportunity to practice. The combination was marvelous."

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