After unveiling a new regional strategy last summer that included additional commitments of forces to Afghanistan and a promise to “no longer be silent” on disputes with Pakistan over militant sanctuaries on its territory, the Trump administration began the year with an announcement that it was suspending military assistance to Pakistan. What are the pros and cons and likely results of the administration’s approach to Pakistan, and how are Pakistani leaders responding to increased U.S. pressure?

On February 12 at the U.S. Institute of Peace, regional experts assessed the current state of U.S.-Pakistan relations and discuss how the United States’ security concerns in the region are likely to shape future ties. Review the conversation on Twitter with #USPakWhatsNext.

Speakers

Andrew Wilder, moderator
Vice President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Tanvi Madan
Director, Brookings Institute India Project

Ambassador Richard Olson
Former Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan

David Sedney
Senior Associate, International Security Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies

Moeed Yusuf
Associate Vice President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Related Publications

Afghanistan’s Parliamentary Vote: A Canary in the Presidential Poll Mine

Afghanistan’s Parliamentary Vote: A Canary in the Presidential Poll Mine

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

By: Scott Worden; Belquis Ahmadi

There is a palpable sense of anticipation in Kabul days before parliamentary elections will be held. Blast walls, billboards and powerline poles are plastered with the campaign posters of the hopeful candidates. With 800 candidates competing for 33 seats in Kabul, winning a seat in the province will be challenge. The possibility of successful electoral process nationally is equally daunting, however, as poor security, delayed preparations and the last-minute introduction of electronic voter verification machines (in a country with spotty electricity) make pulling off a credible vote a real gamble.

Democracy & Governance; Electoral Violence

Afghanistan’s Economic Development Hinges on the Peace Process

Afghanistan’s Economic Development Hinges on the Peace Process

Tuesday, September 4, 2018

By: William Byrd

Breaking out of Afghanistan’s current economic stagnation, rising unemployment, and poverty will only be possible if there is strong, sustained progress toward durable peace and political stability. Lowering security costs and, over time, reducing the extremely high aid dependency is the only way for the country to move toward balancing its budget books.

Economics & Environment; Democracy & Governance

View All Publications