This event was part of a series highlighting themes from “Imagine: Reflections on Peace,” a multimedia exhibit from USIP and The VII Foundation that explores the themes and challenges of peacebuilding through an immersive look at societies that suffered — and survived — violent conflict.

The use of sexual violence by the Russian military as a strategy and weapon of war and terror is a devastating consequence of Russia’s aggression. The United States has reaffirmed its unwavering support for Ukraine’s security, democracy and human rights. Addressing the onslaught of sexual violence, which is disproportionately perpetrated against women and girls, is central to this commitment. Steps toward preventing, mitigating and responding to this violence need to be integrated within an overall strategic security effort, including in the prevention of atrocities.

On June 6, USIP held a conversation with U.N. Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) on Sexual Violence in Conflict Pramila Patten following her recent visit to Ukraine. During the visit, SRSG Patten signed a Framework of Cooperation between the government of Ukraine and the United Nations to support conflict-related sexual violence prevention and response efforts.

Take part in the conversation on Twitter with #UkraineUSIP.

Speakers

Lise Grande, opening remarks
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace 

The Honorable Pramila Patten
U.N. Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict

Donald Jensen, moderator
Director, Europe and Russia, U.S. Institute of Peace 

 

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