On October 24, the U.S. Institute of Peace, the U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy, the McCain Institute and the Truman National Security Project-Center for National Policy convened a non-partisan meeting with senior diplomatic, military, media and NGO leaders on assessing civilian risk and engagement in diplomacy. 

Ambassador Ryan C. Crocker

In an era where "zero-risk" environments abroad no longer exist, how does the United States address the question of risk for American civilians who want to pursue productive careers in diplomacy and development? With non-state actors increasingly shaping the international system, how can American diplomats and development workers engage effectively in environments critical to the defense of U.S. national interests in the 21st century? And how do we recruit, retain and support a new generation of men and women to do so?

USIP, the U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy (ACPD), the McCain Institute and the Truman National Security Project-Center for National Policy were pleased to host a special non-partisan meeting on October 24 where diplomatic, military, media and NGO leaders from government and the private sector joined forces for a discussion on these issues and more. Continue the conversation on Twitter with #FrontlineCivilians.

Please see the agenda for the full list of speakers. Featured speakers and moderators included:

  • Ambassador Ryan C. Crocker
    Dean and Executive Professor, The Bush School of Government & Public Service, Texas A&M University
    Member, Broadcasting Board of Governors
    Former U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Syria, Kuwait, and Lebanon
  • Admiral James G. Stavridis, USN (Ret)
    Dean, The Fletcher School, Tufts University
    Former NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe and Commander, U.S. European Command
  • Ambassador James F. Jeffrey
    Philip Solondz Distinguished Visiting Fellow, The Washington Institute
    Former Deputy National Security Advisor and U.S. Ambassador to Iraq and Turkey
  • Ambassador William B. Taylor, Jr.
    Acting President, U.S. Institute of Peace
    Former Special Coordinator for Middle East Transitions, U.S. Department of State, and U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine
  • William J. Hybl
    Chairman, U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy
  • Ambassador Kurt Volker
    Executive Director, The McCain Institute for International Leadership
    Former U.S. Ambassador to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
  • The Hon. Doug Wilson
    Chairman, Board of Advisors, Truman National Security Project-Center for National Policy
    Former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Public Affairs, U.S. Department of Defense
  • Ambassador Frederick Barton
    Former Assistant Secretary for Conflict and Stabilization Operations, U.S. Department of State
  • Jean E. Manes
    Principal Deputy Coordinator for International Information Programs, U.S. Department of State
  • Michael Crowley
    Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent, TIME Magazine
  • Matthew Rosenberg
    Foreign Correspondent, The New York Times

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