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This event, co-sponsored by USIP, Refugees International, and the Refugee Council USA, analyzed the roots and consequences of the crisis, the frameworks that are emerging for its resolution, and the responsibilities of governments, civil society, and international donors as elaborated within the frame of the 2004 Mexico Plan of Action and Declaration.

The issue of displacement in Latin America has reached crisis proportions.  With between 3.6 million and  5.2 million displaced persons throughout the region and a pattern of ongoing displacement, the search for durable solutions is more urgent than ever.  What are the roles of civil society, regional governments, and international donors in addressing this crisis?  

This event, co-sponsored by USIP, Refugees International, and the Refugee Council USA, analyzed the roots and consequences of the crisis, the frameworks that are emerging for its resolution, and the responsibilities of governments, civil society, and international donors as elaborated within the frame of the 2004 Mexico Plan of Action and Declaration. The event marks the launch of a new book based on last year’s Regional Humanitarian Conference in Quito, Ecuador, that brought together local and international civil society with regional governments and international donors to assess the implementation of the 2004 Plan and Declaration. Panelists will address the causes of forced displacement and integrated solutions and policies for its mitigation.  They will discuss the short and long-term strategies being used to address the roots of the crisis and associated violence, and will discuss how displaced families can be more effectively supported.  

Speakers

  • David Robinson, Interim Assistant Secretary
    Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration, U.S. Department of State
  • Michel Gabaudan, President
    Refugees International
  • Zully Laverde, Director
    Ecuador Office of CODHES
  • Buti Kale, Deputy Representative
    Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
  • Fernando Ponce Leon, S.J., Director
    Jesuit Refugee and Migration Service, Latin America
  • Melanie Nezer, Senior Director, U.S. Policy & Advocacy
    Refugee Council USA
  • Virginia Bouvier, Moderator
    Senior Program Officer, USIP Centers of Innovation

 

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