Upon the publication of "Pandemics and Peace: Public Health Cooperation in Zones of Conflict" (USIP Press, June 2011), panelists Dr. Jose Fernandez, Dr. Allyn Taylor, and author Dr. William J. Long discussed the relationship between pandemics and peace.


The spread of infectious disease threats—particularly those with pandemic potential, including Avian flu, H1N1 flu, and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS)—has and continues to present a grave health, security and humanitarian threat regionally and globally with direct implications for peacekeeping efforts.

Upon the publication of "Pandemics and Peace: Public Health Cooperation in Zones of Conflict" (USIP Press, June 2011),  panelists Dr. Jose Fernandez, Dr. Allyn Taylor, and author Dr. William J. Long discussed the relationship between pandemics and peace.  Topics included the correlation between infectious disease control and the use of military forces, the successes and challenges of the implementation of the new International Health Regulations, the relationship between public health cooperation and transnational political cooperation, and the U.S. role in global health cooperation.

Speakers

  • William J. Long
    Professor and Chair
    Sam Nunn School of International Affairs
    Georgia Institute of Technology
    USIP Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow, 2009-2010
  • Jose Fernandez
    Acting Deputy Director
    Division of International Health Security
    Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response
    United States Department of Health and Human Services
  • Allyn L. Taylor
    Visiting Professor of Law
    Georgetown University Law Center
  • Leonard Rubenstein, Moderator
    Chair, USIP Health and Peacebuilding Working Group
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
  • Chantal De Jonge Oudraat, Introductions
    Director
    Jennings Randolph Fellowship Program
    United States Institute of Peace

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