As the most dynamic and fastest-growing region on earth, the Indo-Pacific is a leading priority for U.S. foreign policy and essential to global security and prosperity. In 2022, the United States inaugurated its Indo-Pacific Strategy, which lays out a shared vision for a free and open region that is more connected, prosperous, secure and resilient. Over the past two years, the United States has continually worked alongside partners, allies and friends in the Indo-Pacific to implement this landmark strategy, achieve significant economic and diplomatic milestones, and deliver tangible benefits for the region and its people.

On February 15, USIP, in collaboration with the U.S. State Department, hosted a conversation on the economic components of the Indo-Pacific Strategy, the strategic alliances formed under this framework, and the milestones achieved since its inaugural date.

Continue the conversation on social media using the hashtags #USIndoPacific and #IndoPacificStrategy.

Speakers

Lise Grande 
President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

Dr. Mira Rapp-Hooper
Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for East Asia and Oceania, U.S. National Security Council

Assistant Secretary Donald Lu 
Assistant Secretary of State for South and Central Asian Affairs

Assistant Secretary Dr. Ely Ratner 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Indo-Pacific Security Affairs 

Deputy Assistant Secretary Camille Dawson
Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs

Vikram Singh, moderator 
Senior Advisor, South Asia, U.S. Institute of Peace

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