Error message

Attacks by militants in Kashmir, clashes during public protests and military skirmishes across the Line of Control have escalated tensions between India and Pakistan over the past year to a dangerous degree. The resulting military and civilian casualties fuel a volatile situation between these two nuclear-armed neighbors that poses mounting risks for regional security as well as long-term U.S. interests for peace and stability in South Asia. Join USIP on December 19 for a discussion with a diverse group of South Asia experts on the crisis and the potential U.S. diplomatic role under the next U.S. administration.

IP 5254-X3.jpg
Pictured left to right, Sedand Dhume, Toby Dalton, Moeed Yusuf, Sameer Lawani, Shamila Chaudhary

South Asia didn’t feature prominently during the U.S. presidential campaign, but the U.S. holds important strategic interests on counter-terrorism, trade and development in the region. So far the U.S. has played an important role in de-escalating tensions between India and Pakistan. 

Panelists will discuss the dangers of a persistently hostile India-Pakistan relationship, and what policies the next U.S. administration could pursue to manage crises and promote greater peace and security in South Asia.

Shamila Chaudhary
Senior Advisor to the Dean, Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies

Toby Dalton
Co-Director, Nuclear Policy Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Sadanand Dhume
Resident Fellow, American Enterprise Institute

Sameer Lalwani
Deputy Director, South Asia Program, Stimson Center

Moeed Yusuf, Moderator
Associate Vice President, Asia Center, U.S. Institute of Peace

Related Publications

Obama Visit to New Delhi Stirs Islamabad’s Scramble to Compete

Obama Visit to New Delhi Stirs Islamabad’s Scramble to Compete

Thursday, February 5, 2015

By: Amy Calfas

Above the sounds of cheering during President Obama’s recent visit to New Delhi for the 66th Republic Day military parade, a chorus of discontent emerged across the international border to the northwest. In the perennial regional competition between India and Pakistan, the U.S. leader’s second visit to one while again steering clear of the other could have serious implications for strategic stability in South Asia.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Justice, Security & Rule of Law

India-Pakistan Needs Trump Administration’s Focus

India-Pakistan Needs Trump Administration’s Focus

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

By: Fred Strasser

Relations between India and Pakistan are becoming less predictable as nationalist sentiments in India heighten political pressure there to escalate its response to clashes in the disputed territory of Kashmir, specialists on the two states said. The incoming administration of President-elect Donald Trump should develop clearer U.S. policies to ease strains between the nuclear-armed states, the analysts said at the U.S. Institute of Peace. 

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Global Policy; Fragility and Resilience

Myanmar Peace Process: Slow Progress, Delicate Steps

Myanmar Peace Process: Slow Progress, Delicate Steps

Thursday, November 10, 2016

By: Fred Strasser

The peace process in Myanmar, which seeks to end decades of conflicts between the country’s army and an array of rebel groups, is progressing fitfully but could still face a reversal, experts on the Southeast Asian nation said in a discussion at the U.S. Institute of Peace. To drive it forward will require that the country’s new democratic leadership to skillfully manage relations with the still-powerful military while pushing negotiations and building confidence with the nation’s diverse arm...

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Justice, Security & Rule of Law

U.S. Leadership and the Challenge of ‘State Fragility’

U.S. Leadership and the Challenge of ‘State Fragility’

Monday, September 12, 2016

By: William J. Burns; Michèle Flournoy; Nancy Lindborg

The new administration, a coming change in leadership at the United Nations, and an emerging global consensus about the fragility challenge make this an opportune moment to recalibrate our approach. The United States cannot and should not try to “fix” every fragile state. Nor can we ignore this challenge; all fragility has the potential to affect U.S. interests to some extent, especially when left to fester. There is simply too much at stake for our interests, our partners, and the global ord...

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Violent Extremism; Economics & Environment; Education & Training; Gender; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Justice, Security & Rule of Law; Education & Training; Youth; Fragility and Resilience; Global Policy; Human Rights

View All Publications