In an era of rapid technological change and fraying traditional alliances, the international order that has overseen one of the most peaceful periods in human history is facing unprecedented challenges. While member states grapple with the utility and relevance of the United Nations in the 21st century, global fragility, conflict, and violence continue to escalate—exacting an enormous human toll. The imperative for collective global action to resolve the world’s most intractable conflicts has never been greater.

In light of these trends, it’s critical that the community of actors committed to global peace and security take stock of the successes, challenges, and innovations in multilateral conflict prevention, mediation, and peacebuilding. 

On January 29, USIP, The Stimson Center, Alliance for Peacebuilding, and the United Nations Association of the National Capital Area convened for a timely discussion on the future of the multilateral system and the potential for practical, innovative reform with U.N. Undersecretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs Rosemary DiCarlo, the highest-ranking American currently serving at the United Nations and the first woman to hold the position. As a precursor to the U.N.’s 75th anniversary in 2020, this event considered how the U.N. has modernized its conflict prevention and management resources to address the changing nature of conflict; how reforms of the U.N.’s political and peacebuilding architecture have improved its effectiveness, as well as what steps are still needed; and what practical actions U.S. and international policymakers can take to support more durable multilateral peacebuilding efforts.

Continue the conversation with #DiCarloUSIP.

Speakers

9:30am – 10:00am: Refreshments

10:00am – 10:10am: Welcome Remarks and Introduction

  • The Honorable Nancy Lindborg
    President & CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

10:10am – 10:30am: Keynote Address

  • Ambassador Rosemary DiCarlo
    Undersecretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations

10:30am – 11:50am: Facilitated Panel Discussion with Undersecretary-General DiCarlo

  • Ambassador Rosemary DiCarlo
    Undersecretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations
  • Ms. Victoria Holt
    Vice President, Stimson Center
  • Ambassador Jonathan Moore
    Acting Assistant Secretary, Bureau of International Organization Affairs, U.S. Department of State
  • Ambassador Lynn Pascoe
    Board Member, United Nations Association of the National Capital Area; former UN Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs
  • Ms. Uzra Zeya
    President & CEO, Alliance for Peacebuilding
  • Ambassador George Moose, moderator
    Vice Chairman of the Board, U.S. Institute of Peace; Advisory Council Member, United Nations Association of the National Capital Area

11:50am – 12:00pm: Closing Remarks

  • Ambassador Rosemary DiCarlo
    Undersecretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations

Related Publications

A Global Democratic Renaissance or a More Volatile World?

A Global Democratic Renaissance or a More Volatile World?

Thursday, June 10, 2021

By: Anthony Navone

With a staggering array of immediate crises facing the world — from the COVID pandemic to a global increase in extremist violence — it sometimes feels difficult, perhaps even impossible, to look beyond the current moment and envision what the world will look in the coming decades. However, looming demographic, economic, environmental and technological shifts are already starting to affect the global geopolitical environment — not only worsening our current crises, but inciting new ones should we fail to put in place long-term strategies to address them.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance; Economics & Environment; Justice, Security & Rule of Law

The Dilemma for Kenya’s Police Amid the Pandemic

The Dilemma for Kenya’s Police Amid the Pandemic

Wednesday, May 26, 2021

By: Rebecca Ebenezer-Abiola

From Nigeria to the United States and beyond, the added pressures of COVID-19 have pushed community-police relations to the breaking point as police have found themselves thrust to the frontlines of the coronavirus response. This issue has been particularly acute in Kenya, where police were tasked with new responsibilities without proper equipment or information. The resulting confusion has been a catalyst for increased tensions between the police and everyday Kenyans — including reports of violent and heavy-handed crackdowns from police.

Type: Blog

Global Health; Justice, Security & Rule of Law

How Missing Data Can Make the Global Fragility Strategy Work

How Missing Data Can Make the Global Fragility Strategy Work

Thursday, May 20, 2021

By: Michael F. Harsch; Calin Trenkov-Wermuth, Ph.D.

As glaring inequalities in the global recovery from COVID-19 become clearer, the U.N. has warned of growing risks of political tensions and conflict in many countries. This poses a daunting challenge to U.S. foreign policy and presents a test for the new Global Fragility Strategy (GFS), which aims to reduce state fragility and break cycles of violence in critical regions. What the GFS lacks, however, is a clear “theory of success” that explains why and how proposed actions will lead to desired outcomes in fragile states. A new capacity-based approach is needed to identify fragile states with high potential for effective engagement, particularly security sector reform (SSR).

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & Resilience; Justice, Security & Rule of Law

Extending Constitutional Rights to Pakistan’s Tribal Areas

Extending Constitutional Rights to Pakistan’s Tribal Areas

Tuesday, April 6, 2021

By: Umar Mahmood Khan; Rana Hamza Ijaz; Sevim Saadat

When Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas were officially merged into Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province in May 2018, the five million residents of the former tribal areas acquired the same constitutional rights and protections—including access to a formal judicial system—as Pakistan’s other citizens. This report, based on field research carried out by the authors, explores the status of the formal justice system’s expansion, finding both positive trends and severe administrative and capacity challenges, and offers recommendations to address these issues.

Type: Special Report

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

View All Publications