Watch the Live Webcast

 

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has violated our most fundamental international norms, challenged Ukraine’s sovereignty and subjected its population to mass atrocities. But with support from the United States and like-minded allies, the Ukrainian government has engaged in a coordinated legal challenge to the invasion — contesting its legal basis, collecting and analyzing evidence of crimes committed against civilians, and prosecuting perpetrators of war crimes. Yet, as Russia regroups and adapts its military tactics, there’s still much to be done to repel the invasion, shore up Ukraine’s sovereignty and deliver justice to the Ukrainian people.

Join USIP and the Ukrainian Embassy for a discussion of ongoing legal efforts to defend Ukraine’s sovereignty and deliver justice for the Ukrainian people. This event will mark the celebration of Ukrainian Constitution Day, which commemorates the signing of the country’s constitution in 1996. USIP experts and Ukrainian officials will be joined by U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for Global Criminal Justice Beth Van Schaack to discuss ways the United States and like-minded actors have supported Ukraine in holding Russia accountable.

Join the conversation on Twitter with #UkraineUSIP.

Speakers

Ambassador Oksana Markarova, opening remarks 
Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Ukraine to the United States

Lise Grande, moderator
President and CEO, United States Institute of Peace 

Ambassador Anton Korynevych
Ambassador-at-Large, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Ukraine
Agent of Ukraine before the International Court of Justice in the Allegations of Genocide Case

Eli M. Rosenbaum 
Director, Human Rights Enforcement Policy and Strategy, Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section, U.S. Department of Justice

Ambassador Beth Van Schaack 
Ambassador-at-Large for Global Criminal Justice, U.S. Department of State

Iryna Venediktova
Prosecutor General of Ukraine

Ambassador William B. Taylor, closing remarks
Vice President, Russia and Europe, U.S. Institute of Peace; Former U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine

 

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