The Central African Republic (CAR) has recently taken a significant step toward peace after years of violence and instability. In February, negotiations convened under the auspices of the African Union led to a peace agreement between the CAR government and leaders of armed groups. Now President Faustin-Archange Touadéra must lead the implementation of the agreement to resolve the many complex issues that have driven violence in the country. On April 9, President Touadéra visited the U.S. Institute of Peace to discuss his priorities and vision for building peace in CAR.

Since gaining independence from France in 1960, CAR has experienced chronic instability and outbreaks of violent conflict. The most recent crisis began in late 2012 when a coalition of armed groups banded together to seize control of the country, ushering in an unprecedented level of violence that culminated in a bloody coup d'état. While a transitional government was able to hold the country’s first peaceful, democratic election in 2016, ongoing violence and instability threaten to erode this progress. In 2018, intensifying clashes and deepening divisions led to a record 1.1 million people displaced by the conflict and made CAR one of the deadliest countries in the world for aid workers.

The CAR government, in partnership with the international community, is working to address the longstanding grievances driving the conflict and the profound insecurity affecting many of the country’s citizens. Early this year, the African Union led peace negotiations between the government and armed groups in Khartoum, Sudan, the eighth attempt at a peace deal. With support from a wide range of stakeholders, the dialogue produced a new peace deal outlining steps to reduce conflict and build peace.

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Panelists

His Excellency Faustin-Archange Touadéra
President, Central African Republic

Ambassador Johnnie Carson
Senior Advisor, U.S. Institute of Peace

The Honorable Nancy Lindborg, moderator
President & CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

Ambassador Lucy Tamlyn, opening remarks
U.S. Ambassador, Central African Republic

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