Elizabeth Murray is a senior advisor on peacebuilding and inclusion at the U.S. Institute of Peace. She leads the Institute’s efforts on disability-inclusive peacebuilding and advises on programming and research in the Sub-Saharan Africa region.

Murray first joined USIP in 2008 to work on the Institute’s grantmaking in Colombia. She has led USIP’s grantmaking in several countries and has managed programs and research in Sudan and Central African Republic. In addition to the inclusion of people with disabilities in peacebuilding, her thematic interests include national dialogues, political transitions and migration.

Prior to joining USIP, Murray managed educational programs at the Kennedy Center and served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Costa Rica. She holds a bachelor’s degree in international politics and Latin American studies from Georgetown University, a master’s degree in conflict analysis and resolution from George Mason University, and a graduate certificate in international migration studies from Georgetown University.

Publications By Elizabeth

The Role of Accessibility and Funding in Disability-Inclusive Peacebuilding

The Role of Accessibility and Funding in Disability-Inclusive Peacebuilding

Friday, July 29, 2022

By: Elizabeth Murray;  Rashad Nimr

Persons with disabilities are often left out of peace processes despite comprising an estimated 15 percent of the world’s population. Among those most acutely affected by violence and armed conflict, persons with disabilities who are living in — or attempting to leave — conflict zones face numerous threats to their physical and mental wellbeing, which can aggravate pre-existing disability or lead to secondary disability. Armed conflict and violence also increase the number of newly acquired disabilities, and many of those individuals face the same barriers and challenges as persons with existing disabilities — but without the previous lived experience.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Human RightsPeace Processes

La Transition Retardée du Tchad Frustre ses Citoyens

La Transition Retardée du Tchad Frustre ses Citoyens

Wednesday, July 13, 2022

By: Yamingué Betinbaye;  Elizabeth Murray

On May 14, demonstrations against France’s influence in Chad turned violent, injuring several policemen and leading to damage at several French-owned gasoline stations in Chad’s capital city of N'Djamena. Wakit Tamaa, the civil society and opposition coalition that called for the demonstrations, had organized the event for participants to express their disapproval of French military influence in the country — including perceived French support for the Transitional Military Council (CMT) that has ruled the country since April 2021.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & GovernancePeace Processes

Chad’s Delayed Transition is Frustrating Its Citizens

Chad’s Delayed Transition is Frustrating Its Citizens

Wednesday, July 13, 2022

By: Yamingué Betinbaye;  Elizabeth Murray

On May 14, demonstrations against France’s influence in Chad turned violent, injuring several policemen and leading to damage at several French-owned gasoline stations in Chad’s capital city of N'Djamena. Wakit Tamaa, the civil society and opposition coalition that called for the demonstrations, had organized the event for participants to express their disapproval of French military influence in the country — including perceived French support for the Transitional Military Council (CMT) that has ruled the country since April 2021.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & GovernancePeace Processes

Dialogues nationaux sur la consolidation de la paix et les transitions créativité et pensée adaptative

Dialogues nationaux sur la consolidation de la paix et les transitions créativité et pensée adaptative

Monday, December 13, 2021

By: Elizabeth Murray;  Susan Stigant

Dans le meilleur des cas, les processus de dialogue national promettent d’apporter un élan décisif à la transformation inclusive du conflit. Ce rapport examine les dialogues dans six pays: la République Centrafricaine, le Kenya, le Liban, le Sénégal, la Tunisie et le Yémen. Ces divers processus montrent les possibilités de favoriser le dialogue, de forger des accords et de progresser vers la paix; et le rapport offre des conseils détaillés sur les possibilités et les aspects pratiques pour ceux qui envisagent d'organiser un dialogue national.

Type: Peaceworks

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

View All