Elizabeth Murray is a senior program officer in the Africa Program. She manages USIP’s research and programming in Central African Republic and Sudan, including convening USIP’s Sudan Working Group. She also co-directs USIP’s research on national dialogues.

Murray first joined USIP in 2008 to work on the Institute’s grantmaking in Colombia, and subsequently led the Institute’s grantmaking on the Colombia, the Horn of Africa, Sudan, and South Sudan before assuming her current role. Prior to joining USIP, she managed educational programs at the Kennedy Center and served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Costa Rica.

During her tenure at USIP, Murray has authored or co-authored articles, reports, and book chapters on Central African Republic, Honduras, and Uganda, as well as national dialogues. In addition to authoring several USIP publications, she is the co-author with Susan Stigant of the chapter “Building a Common Vision of the State: The Role of National Dialogues,” in The Fabric of Peace in Africa: Looking Beyond the State, edited by Pamela Aall and Chester A. Crocker. She has made media appearances on conflict dynamics in Uganda and Central African Republic.

Murray holds a bachelor’s degree in international politics and Latin American studies from Georgetown University and a master’s degree in conflict analysis and resolution from George Mason University. She is currently pursuing a graduate certificate in international migration studies from Georgetown University.

Publications By Elizabeth

Dialogues nationaux sur la consolidation de la paix et les transitions créativité et pensée adaptative

Dialogues nationaux sur la consolidation de la paix et les transitions créativité et pensée adaptative

Monday, December 13, 2021

By: Elizabeth Murray;  Susan Stigant

Dans le meilleur des cas, les processus de dialogue national promettent d’apporter un élan décisif à la transformation inclusive du conflit. Ce rapport examine les dialogues dans six pays: la République Centrafricaine, le Kenya, le Liban, le Sénégal, la Tunisie et le Yémen. Ces divers processus montrent les possibilités de favoriser le dialogue, de forger des accords et de progresser vers la paix; et le rapport offre des conseils détaillés sur les possibilités et les aspects pratiques pour ceux qui envisagent d'organiser un dialogue national.

Type: Peaceworks

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

Disability-Inclusive Peacebuilding: State of the Field and the Way Forward

Disability-Inclusive Peacebuilding: State of the Field and the Way Forward

Wednesday, October 13, 2021

By: Elizabeth Murray

Despite being an estimated 15 percent of the world’s population, people with disabilities are not routinely included in peacebuilding, which would benefit from their expertise and perspectives. Although efforts to include marginalized populations can help, the current deficits are too great to be remedied through general approaches. This report covers the state of the field, identifies gaps and opportunities, and makes recommendations for the inclusion and meaningful participation of people with disabilities in peacebuilding. 

Type: Special Report

Human Rights

National Dialogues in Peacebuilding and Transitions: Creativity and Adaptive Thinking

National Dialogues in Peacebuilding and Transitions: Creativity and Adaptive Thinking

Tuesday, June 8, 2021

By: Elizabeth Murray;  Susan Stigant;  (editors)

At their best, national dialogues hold the promise of adding critical momentum in the drive to transform conflict inclusively. This report examines dialogues in six countries—the Central African Republic, Kenya, Lebanon, Senegal, Tunisia, and Yemen. These diverse processes show the possibilities for fostering dialogue, forging agreements, and driving toward peace; and the report offers extensive guidance on the possibilities and practicalities for those considering convening a national dialogue.

Type: Peaceworks

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

Central African Republic’s Disputed Elections Exacerbate Rising Tensions

Central African Republic’s Disputed Elections Exacerbate Rising Tensions

Thursday, January 7, 2021

By: Elizabeth Murray;  Rachel Sullivan

After an election period marked by violence and rising tension, the Central African Republic’s (CAR) incumbent president, Faustin Archange Touadéra, has been re-elected, according to the country’s election commission. Days before the vote, a disparate medley of armed groups coalesced to demand the vote be postponed. Since the polls’ closing, there has been a serious spike in violence with fighting in many major towns. The political opposition as well as the newly formed armed coalition have rejected the results and have demanded a re-run election. USIP’s Elizabeth Murray and Rachel Sullivan explain what led to rising violence in the weeks before the polls, what it means for the floundering 2019 peace agreement, and where the international community stands.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Electoral Violence

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