The Central African Republic (CAR) has suffered from a cycle of violent coups since gaining independence in 1960. In 2016, the country’s first peaceful, democratic election raised hopes that CAR was beginning to stabilize, but more recently, violence between armed groups has escalated. U.S. Institute of Peace programs in CAR seek to establish effective two-way communication between government officials and communities on local security concerns. USIP’s Initiative to Measure Peace and Conflict Outcomes works with U.S. government-funded programs in CAR to broaden their ability to share information and boost overall effectiveness. 

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Central African Republic Struggles to Implement Peace Deal

Central African Republic Struggles to Implement Peace Deal

Thursday, October 17, 2019

By: Elizabeth Murray; Rachel Sullivan

The peace agreement signed in the Central African Republic (CAR) in early 2019 is the eighth in seven years, numbers that suggest how difficult it will be to even attempt to end to the country’s multi-sided conflict. That said, the accord this time was reached after more extensive preparations for talks and with greater international support than in the past, perhaps improving conditions for a sustainable halt to violence that has displaced more than 1.2 million people.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Peace Processes

What is the Central African Republic’s Divided Parliament For?

What is the Central African Republic’s Divided Parliament For?

Monday, February 4, 2019

By: Aly Verjee; Soleil-Parfait Kalessopo

As the U.S. House of Representatives continues to adapt to the leadership of a new speaker, 6,000 miles away, the legislature of the Central African Republic (CAR), the National Assembly, has also recently elected a new leader. However, a change of leadership will not be sufficient to overcome the many challenges and weaknesses faced by this parliament, as the country continues to face rebel groups, communal violence, corruption, and intransigent poverty. The responses of many representatives to recent interviews with USIP raise a more fundamental question: given the context of the CAR, what is a parliament for?

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance

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