Power-sharing arrangements are often applied as a means to address conflict between two parties. But practitioners and policymakers alike agree that the foundation for such arrangements requires considerable strategy and planning, including articulating clear objectives and expectations. Under what conditions do power-sharing arrangements work? What are the key ingredients to help unity governments succeed? Do power-sharing arrangements build political trust by delivering to citizens?

The U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a discussion exploring these critical questions. By exploring recent research in the Philippines, the panel considered the effects a power-sharing peace agreement has on citizens' trust in the national government, helping policymakers better understand how to build political trust in the aftermath of intrastate conflict. Review the conversation on Twitter with #ProductivePowerSharing.

Speakers

Jeff Helsing
Associate Vice President, U.S. Institute of Peace

Rosarie Tucci 
Director, Inclusive Societies, U.S. Institute of Peace

Susan Stigant
Director, Africa Programs, U.S. Institute of Peace

Caroline Hartzell
Professor, Political Science Department, Gettysburg College

Matthew Hoddie
Associate Professor, Towson University

Clark Letterman
Survey Research Specialist, Research Triangle Institute International

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