Esta guía de acción busca tender puentes entre los profesionales en la construcción de la paz y la acción no violenta a fin de que se usen métodos de manera estratégica y con eficacia en el camino hacia la transformación de conflictos. Muestra cómo el diálogo, las habilidades de acción directa y los enfoques se pueden sinergizar para avanzar la justicia y la paz sostenible. Esta guía está destinada a capacitadores, facilitadores y otros profesionales que trabajan para los numerosos organizadores, activistas, mediadores, negociadores y constructores de la paz que buscan aprender más sobre cómo integrar estrategias de acción no violenta y construcción de la paz en su trabajo.

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Contenido

  • Documento base sobre la acción no violenta y los procesos de construcción de la paz estratégicos
  • SNAP: Guía práctica para promover sinergias entre la acción no violenta y la construccion de la paz
  • Unidad 1: Promover sinergias para el éxito
  • Unidad 2: Inicio estratégico para una transformación de conflictos exitosa
  • Unidad 3: Diálogo para distender conflictos interpersonales y respaldar la formación de coaliciones.
  • Unidad 4: Facilitando el Desarrollo de consensos y metas grupales
  • Unidad 5: Evaluación para desarrollar concientización y una mejor estrategia
  • Unidad 6: Determinación de metas SMARTT
  • Unidad 7: Innovación y secuencia de tácticas de acción no violenta para generar poder
  • Unidad 8: Secuenciación de tácticas de negociación y acción no violenta para lograr soluciones sostenibles
  • Unidad 9: Armando el rompecabezas: Líneas temporales para la planificación estratégica.
  • Glosario

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