The RESOLVE Network  is a global consortium of researchers and research organizations in agreement that factors contributing to community vulnerability and resilience to violent extremism are contextual.

Origins

International stakeholders launched the Researching Solutions to Violent Extremism (RESOLVE) Network in September 2015 during a summit held on the sidelines of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. The primary goal of the Network is to generate, facilitate, aggregate, and synthesize methodologically sound, locally informed research on the drivers of vulnerability and sources of resilience to violent social movements and extremism.

Vision

Leveraging locally-informed research and analysis to illuminate drivers of violent extremism and identify solutions.

Mission

Connect, capture, curate, and catalyze locally informed research on violent extremism to promote effective policy and practice.

Structure

The United States Institute of Peace hosts the RESOLVE Network Secretariat at its headquarters in Washington, DC. The Network is primarily supported by its Steering Committee, Secretariat, Strategic Network Partners, and Honorary Partners.

Partners

Visit our website or email partnerships@resolvenet.org to learn more about RESOLVE partnerships and how to become a member of the Network.

Objectives

  • Catalyze collaboration between organizations and individuals around the world to leverage locally informed research to identify effective responses to violent extremism;
  • Support the aggregation and synthesis of data, analysis, best practices and tools to address violent extremism through the establishment of a shared Knowledge Platform;
  • Grow the cadre of local researchers and expand their capacity to leverage methodologically sound analysis to influence policy and practice and to connect and train future generations of researchers, practitioners, and thought leaders;
  • Facilitate comprehensive identification of knowledge gaps on the dynamics of violent extremism
  • Enhance the understanding of indicators and drivers of violent extremism;
  • Facilitate the development of a shared research agenda in response to policymakers’ and practitioners’ needs to address the problem of violent extremism
  • Connect people working on common themes to create a community of practice that will help support local research and link that research to policymakers and practitioners;
  • Support the development of quality, evidence-based local research and program evaluation and practice evaluation and;
  • Disseminate analysis and research findings to policymakers and practitioners at all levels, from the local to the international.

Resolve in the News

resolve seal

Contact Us

resolve@resolvenet.org
www.resolvenet.org

Related Publications

To Stabilize Iraq After ISIS, Help Iraqis Reconcile

To Stabilize Iraq After ISIS, Help Iraqis Reconcile

Sunday, February 11, 2018

By: USIP Staff; Nancy Lindborg; Sarhang Hamasaeed

An international conference opens in Kuwait Monday to plan ways to rebuild Iraq and secure it against renewed extremist violence following the three-year war against ISIS. A USIP team just spent nine days in Iraq for talks with government and civil society leaders, part of the Institute’s years-long effort to help the country stabilize. The Kuwait conference will gather government, business and civil society leaders to consider a reconstruction that Iraq has said could cost $100 billion. USIP’s president, Nancy Lindborg, and Middle East program director, Sarhang Hamasaeed, say any realistic rebuilding plan must focus also on the divisions and grievances in Iraq that led to ISIS’ violence and that still exist.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention; Violent Extremism

Tunisia: Democratic but Precarious

Tunisia: Democratic but Precarious

Friday, December 22, 2017

By: James Rupert

Amid central Tunisia’s dry farmlands, the city of Sidi Bouzid bustled one recent day under warm autumn sunshine. Street vendors and shoppers jostled under the roof of a new, open-air market, selling and buying produce or cheap clothes. Seven years after an impoverished street vendor in this city immolated himself and ignited the Arab Spring revolutions, his homeland has achieved a precarious stability. By many measures the Arab world’s only democracy, Tunisia remains hobbled by corruption, unemployment and violent extremism.

Democracy & Governance; Violent Extremism

The Middle East: Divided, Dysfunctional

The Middle East: Divided, Dysfunctional

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

By: Garrett Nada

Even before President Donald Trump upended a core U.S. policy recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, late 2017 has been tumultuous in the Middle East. The Islamic State (ISIS) “caliphate” collapsed. Syria’s Assad regime all but won the six-year civil war, consolidating Iranian and Russian influence. Saudi Arabia purged...

Violent Extremism; Global Policy; Democracy & Governance; Fragility and Resilience

View All Publications