Iraq’s competitive 2018 parliamentary elections were characterized by unexpected new coalitions, shifting alliances, and a politically charged government formation, the consequences of which will be critical in the development of regional dynamics. The continuing threat of ISIS, popular protests in Basra and Mosul, the monumental task of reconstruction, and unresolved tensions with the Kurdistan Regional Government are only a few items on the long list of vexing problems facing the country’s new leadership. On March 29, USIP hosted a conversation with Iraq’s new speaker of the Council of Representatives, Mohammed al-Halbousi, about the Iraqi government’s relationships with the United States, Iran, and its regional neighbors; the ongoing battle against violent extremism; and his vision for peace and stability.

The Arabic version of this event can be found here:

As Iraq’s new parliament and government come to power, fresh leadership presents Iraq with the opportunity to overcome these obstacles and make progress by developing its economy, increasing security, and strengthening governance and social services. Formerly governor of Al-Anbar province during the battle against ISIS, Speaker al-Halbousi met with senior Trump administration officials and congressional leaders during his visit to Washington. The speaker will lead the Council of Representatives as it grapples with these issues and navigates the many challenges of Iraq’s democratic process.

Speakers

The Honorable Nancy Lindborg
President & CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace

His Excellency Mr. Mohammed Al-Halbousi
Speaker, Council of Representatives, Republic of Iraq

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