The threat of violent extremism is evolving. However, significant knowledge gaps continue to pose obstacles to those seeking to prevent and address it. The U.S. Institute of Peace and the RESOLVE Network joined for the Third Annual RESOLVE Network Global Forum on September 20 to explore new research angles and approaches for prevention and intervention of violent extremism in policy and practice.

As the territorial hold by violent extremist organizations diminishes, new problems are emerging as these groups evolve and others seek to manipulate governance and security vacuums to spread their warped mission to new populations and locations. To effectively address dynamic global trends, policymakers and practitioners require a holistic understanding of the nature of violent extremism at both the global and local level.

This forum built from the RESOLVE Network’s previous efforts to meet the needs of policymakers and practitioners to better address the significant gaps in research, evidence, and data on drivers of violent extremism and conflict. The forum convened RESOLVE’s partner organizations, international researchers, practitioners, and policymakers for thought-provoking TED Talk style presentations and salon-style discussions in addition to engaging breakout discussions, presenting an opportunity to learn from experts from across the globe and contribute your own knowledge and expertise to the discussion. Join the conversation on Twitter with #RESOLVEForum.

Agenda

8:30am - 9:00am: Informal RESOLVE Stakeholder Meet and Greet

9:00am - 9:20am: Welcome & Introductory Remarks

  • Ms. Nancy Lindborg, President, U.S. Institute of Peace, @nancylindborg
  • Ms. Leanne Erdberg, Director of CVE, U.S. Institute of Peace

9:20am - 10:30am - Session 1: Individual and Social Conduits of Violent Extremism - TED-Talk Style Presentations

  • Radicalization & Reintegration: Mr. Jesse Morton, Parallel Networks, @_JesseMorton
  • Neuroscience & Conflict: Mr. Michael Niconchuk, Beyond Conflict, @mcniconchuk
  • Historical Grievances & Data: Dr. Chris Meserole, Brookings Institute, @chrismeserole

10:30am - 11:30am: Breakout Discussions

11:30am - 12:30pm - Morning Salon: Secularism in the Lake Chad Basin

  • Dr. Ousmanou Adama, RESOLVE Network Research Fellow - Cameroon
  • Dr. Brandon Kendhammer, RESOLVE Network Principal Investigator - Cameroon
  • Dr. Remadji Hoinathy, RESOLVE Network Research Fellow - Chad
  • Dr. Daniel Eizenga, RESOLVE Network Principal Investigator - Chad
  • Dr. Medinat Adeola Abdulazeez, RESOLVE Network Research Fellow - Nigeria
  • Dr. Abdoulaye Sounaye, RESOLVE Network Principal Investigator - Nigeria
  • Moderator: Dr. Jacob Udo-Udo Jacob

12:30pm - 1:30pm: Lunch

1:30pm - 2:45pm - Session 2: From Complex Systems to Meaningful Interventions - TED-Talk Style Presentations

  • Role of Traditional Media: Dr. Emma Heywood, University of Sheffield, @emmaheywood7
  • Everyday Peace Indicators: Dr. Pamina Firchow, George Mason University, @everydaypeacein
  • Comedy & Creative Communications: Mr. Priyank Mathur, Mythos Labs, @PriyankSMathur
  • Nonviolent Action: Dr. Maria J. Stephan, U.S. Institute of Peace, @MariaJStephan

2:45pm - 3:45pm: Breakout Discussion

3:45pm - 5:00pm - Afternoon Salon: Practical Applications of Research to Policy and Practice

5:00pm: Closing Remarks & Reception

  • Mr. Pete Marocco, Deputy Assistant Secretary and Senior Bureau Official for the Bureau of Conflict and Stabilization Operations (CSO), U.S. Department of State
Members of a peace march walking to Wardak, Afghanistan, from Ghazni

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