In addition to the severe human cost, the COVID-19 crisis has forced Pakistan’s already suffering economy to a grinding halt. Social distancing policies, necessary to stop the spread of the virus, have sent the global economy reeling, paralyzed the informal economy, and left Pakistan’s most vulnerable without income and sustenance. Meanwhile, despite a $7.5 billion relief package, both central and provincial governments have struggled to respond as the number of confirmed cases continues to rise daily. As the situation stands, much more will be needed for Pakistan to effectively address the crisis.

Continue the conversation on Twitter with #COVIDPakistan.

On April 23, USIP hosted a virtual expert panel to discuss the economic, political, and governance impacts of the COVID-19 crisis in Pakistan as well as potential long-term solutions.

Speakers

Cyril Almeida
Visiting Senior Expert, U.S. Institute of Peace

Khurram Husain
Business Editor, Dawn Newspaper

Elizabeth Threlkeld
Deputy Director, South Asia, Stimson Center

Uzair Younus
Nonresident Fellow, Atlantic Council

Tamanna Salikuddin, moderator
Director, South Asia, U.S. Institute of Peace

 

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