Pakistan's national elections on July 25 ushered in a new government, with the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaaf (PTI) party now set to head a new governing coalition and former cricket star Imran Khan expected to become prime minister. After a controversial campaign period, the incumbent Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N)—whose former leader Nawaz Sharif was imprisoned just days before the elections—has alleged rigging, military manipulation, and media censorship. Several political parties have also challenged the results of the elections. Should the results stand, the PTI appears to have swept races around the country, and now faces the challenge of governing.

To discuss the outcome of the elections, the shape of the next government, and the complaints and challenges to the outcome, USIP held a conversation with senior representatives from Pakistan’s top three political parties (PTI, PML-N and the Pakistan Peoples Party) via Skype along with experts Daniel Markey and Moeed Yusuf in Washington, D.C. Review the conversation on Twitter with #PkElectionsWhatNow.

Speakers

Syed Tariq Fatemi (via Skype)
Former Special Assistant to the Prime Minister

Daniel Markey
Senior Research Professor, School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University

Naveed Qamar
Former Minister for Defense

Jumaina Siddiqui
Senior Program Officer, U.S. Institute of Peace

Asad Umar
Central Senior Vice President, Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf

Moeed Yusuf, moderator
Associate Vice President, Asia Center, U.S. Institute of Peace

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