Beyond traditional development, improvements to governance are investments in security, broadly defined. Legitimate and effective institutions of governance are better able to address grievances that often lead to violence and, in doing so, preserve the very development gains that can be rolled back with the onset of violent conflict. On July 12, the U.S. Institute of Peace and the World Bank discussed this vital element of the Bank’s “World Development Report 2017: Governance and the Law.”

Development efforts take place in complex political and social conditions, often amid a broken relationship between a government and its people. The state might be fragile or failing, without the institutional capacity or political legitimacy to protect its citizens from instability and violent conflict, let alone achieve development goals. 

The World Development Report  explores how good governance can negotiate the inherent social and political bargaining that takes place among power brokers and ordinary citizens, and reduce—even overcome—barriers to sustainable security, growth and equity. 

Experts from USIP and the World Bank explored the role of governance in supporting development by reducing fragility and violent conflict. Panels discussed the report’s findings and its practical implications in specific countries and situations.

A recording of the event can be found on this event page.

Speakers

Debbie Wetzel 
Senior Director, Governance, World Bank

Edouard Al-Dahdah
Senior Public Sector Specialist and Co-Author of the 2017 World Development Report, World Bank

Franck Bousquet 
Senior Director, Fragility, Conflict and Violence Cross-Cutting Solution Area, World Bank

Philippe Leroux-Martin
Director, Rule of Law, Justice and Security, U.S. Institute of Peace

Nigel Roberts 
Co-Director of the 2011 World Development Report

Abdallah Al-Dardari 
Senior Advisor, MENA Region, World Bank

Ena Dion
Program Officer, Rule of Law, Justice and Security, U.S. Institute of Peace

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